Nonfiction

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Self-Care in Underwear is another lovely gift book from Ton Mak. Get one for your friends who need a gentle reminder to be here now.”

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Beverly Lowry is clear: Deer Creek Drive: A Reckoning of Memory and Murder in the Mississippi Delta is not a memoir.

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Anyone who cares about American politics, democracy, or the Constitution needs to read Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College?

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“‘The scientific man does not aim for an immediate result. . . . His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.

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“Tesla: Wizard at War tells of the process in which ideas—even if dismissed or of questionable credibility—develop.”

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When Freedom Speaks by Lynn Greenky is an excellent introduction and exploration of the contentious field of First Amendment jurisprudence.

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“Throughout the book, O’Rourke mixes positive with negative as he discusses where the country is and how it got here, primarily with his focus on history in Texas.”

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“Deeply researched and written with authority, Snyder’s book examines virtually every aspect of Frankfurter’s career and, despite its length, remains wonderfully readable and accessible.”

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The Facemaker proves an absorbing story of a remarkable surgeon rising to the demands of the most horrifying wounds of modern warfare.”

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The Last American Hero: The Remarkable Life of John Glenn captures the man and his time, his impact on space flight, and the nature of heroism and hero worship.”

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Batja Mesquita, PhD is an affective scientist and a social psychologist.

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“essential reading for anyone concerned with social justice. . . . a blueprint for a Jewish 1619 Project.”

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“Memoir is meant to be an individual story that illuminates the human condition.

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The Covid-19 plague descended with a vengeance on New York City in early March 2020. The city was utterly unprepared, including its preeminent hospitals.

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There is something wrong with contemporary liberal democracy, especially in the United States.

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The Flatboat Patience’s colorful come-and-go crew of cosplaying and pedantic historical re-enactors, a gadget-head food-snob galley chef, and alternately doomsaying and day-saving

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“An excellent introductory or reference volume for the novice history student beginning the study of military history . . .”

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The Secret Life of Butterflies is a gorgeous book with a blue cover loaded with Monarch butterflies.

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Ancestors and forerunners show up in the annals of American literature more often than readers imagine.

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“In these days of isolation and disconnection, Carlson shows us how to enrich our own landscapes, both inner and outer. What seems barren at first can reveal hidden treasures.”

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“Often viciously funny, this book is a breezy balm for the anti-Trump crowd.”

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“There is a realization that comes with reading Trees: that while the collection brings with it an appreciation of Hesse’s work, each essay, each poem can be taken away and treasur

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“without an ability for a nation to protect an objective truth that all political tribes can agree on, there is a substantial challenge in maintaining a healthy American democracy.”

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In the winter of 1949 the celebrated French avant-garde artist Jean Cocteau came to New York to give a talk at the screening of his latest film, The Eagle with Two Heads.

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Veteran reporter Stephen Bates, who once covered both the English royals and religion for the Guardian, has since leaving the newspaper carved out an engaging and enterta

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