Nonfiction

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“Sea power will remain a vital tool of national power, and Mahan remains one of the foremost thinkers on the strategic purpose of naval forces to meet national objectives.”

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“a fascinating, esoteric treatise on gaslighting, which includes not only what this psychological tactic involves, but what it doesn’t, on both the micro and macro levels.”

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If you like stories of adventure across borders in exotic but dangerous places by a brave woman working in a man’s world, this page turner is for you.

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In The Manicurist's Daughter: A Memoir, Susan Lieu seeks to understand her Vietnamese immigrant mother, who died when Lieu was 11, and to reconcile her own identity as both part of, and in

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In this short book filled with drawings and photographs, Edward Ward tells a concise technical service history of the Spitfire, what he describes as the “most important British aircraft of all time

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“a quick read, an often sarcastic and easily relatable tome for anyone who appreciates a woman with cojones.”

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Emily Raboteau is a 47-year-old Black woman of mixed race, who lives in the Bronx, NY, with her husband and two adolescent sons.

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Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity is a collection of essays by Julia Serano originally released in 2007.

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“Anna May’s is not exactly a rags-to-riches story, but it did start with dirty clothes, laboring as a young girl in her family’s laundry business in Los Angeles.

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The Fine Art of Literary Fist-Fighting . . . is often a graceful blend of memoir and history.”

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"A fascinating portrait of a man who left his mark all over present-day Israel in his great buildings and an even bigger mark on Christian imagination."

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“In carefully crafted words, Dubus III both records and enacts his transcendence of the often brutal facts of his upbringing and our time.”

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“The author keeps The Watchmaker’s Daughter a simple, unadorned story that makes the events even more horrific and universal—especially for our times.”

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“What does matter, for us and for the rest of the world’s species, is to remember that ‘We are not doomed. We can build a better future for everyone.

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Mistress of Life and Death is a very upsetting account, but a necessary one. As the author writes . . .

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“‘I became convinced that we must create a world in which no one is super rich—that there must be a cap on the amount of wealth any one person can have.

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Starflower is a true labor of love celebrating resilience, girlhood, and the profoundly transformative power of art.”

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“For the female of the species is more deadly than the male.”

—Rudyard Kipling, from the poem “The Female of the Species.”

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Modern Poetry by Diane Seuss presents readers with an autobiographical collection of poems that delve into the life experiences of the poet.

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“Kalayjian keeps suspense in his entertaining story in telling what might have otherwise been a dry history.”

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“provid[es] a detailed record of the 1924 Washington Senators and the roles of Clark Griffith, Walter Johnson, and Bucky Harris in fulfilling its destiny.”

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Grief Is for People is an eloquent, pensive, and deeply moving paean to a best friend.”

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“For those who don't know Spinoza and for those who do, Buruma offers a truly illuminating book. . . .

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