Nonfiction

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George Grundy has done us all a great service: he’s written a definitive and expansive book about the events of 9/11 and its aftermath.

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One of the great rallying cries of politics in the 21st century is anxiety over rising income inequality.

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Among the many myths that the United States government seems to enjoy perpetrating on its citizens is one of the military and civilian branches of government working together in harmony for the goo

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Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been acknowledged as innocent victims of wrongful conviction.

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“In This Grand Experiment, Jessica Ziparo tells the history of female federal employees in Washington, DC, 1861–1865, ‘an important but overlooked

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The nuclear weapon missile business is contradictory, full of missteps, highly dangerous and prepared in its madness (Mutually Assured Destruction, aka MAD, they used to call it in Cold War days) t

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STEM books are hot topics now and every parent wants their child to be a mathematical whiz, if not a genius.

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“Victoria Moran reminds us that being vegan is not complicated. Have fun . . .”

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“Gordon argues that the Klan represents how some of the most primitive political passions are rooted in fear and hatred of otherness—and a willingness to exploit these sentiments for purpos

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Contemporary readers probably won’t recognize the name Edward Garnett, not unless they’re students and scholars of modern British literature.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates writes with a sound mind and a broken heart, with great power and confessed pain, of America’s relationship to African Americans, of African Americans’ struggle to succeed against

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“One can almost imagine Cinderella’s fairy godmother bibbidy-bobbidy-booing her way around with a postmodern fanfare.”

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“Cézanne Portraits by John Elderfield is an exquisite book based on the exhibition . . .”

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“an excellent resource for the facts and key players in Russian history from the start of WWI to the mid-1920s.” 

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In a time when substance abuse is killing tens of thousands of Americans each year and quality training for addiction treatment providers can be difficult to find, The Spectrum of Addiction: Ev

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Ariel Dorfman’s Homeland Security Ate My Speech is a deeply thoughtful, poetic, and critical analysis of the fractured political landscape in America.

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You don’t find many books like this one in our distempered times.

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This is the largely untold story of French commandos during WWII, led by an aristocrat from a famous family who was trained by the British spy office called Special Operative Executive (SOE).

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“It's All Relative uses humor to discuss sex, paternity, hereditary organizations, privacy, twins, black sheep, evolution, and the import

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Religion, like partisan politics, often leads to diametrically opposed opinion, vociferous debate, and unfortunately at times, overt violence.

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"Squadron: Ending the Africa Slave Trade consists of well-told, gripping, and graphic stories of individual battles against the East African slave

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"a comprehensive biography befitting a giant of the literature of the United States.."

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Consider this epic volume to be the last word in everything you ever wanted to know about The House of Worth and its eponymous founder as well as his descendants.

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Edgar Degas (1834–1917). Two words and a date range that make a pregnant, robust statement.

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