Nonfiction

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“Sobering and frightening as his analysis of the president is, it is also a call to arms.”

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If there are any remaining doubts about the central role played by Ronald Reagan in the unraveling of the Soviet empire, Seth Jones’ riveting new book A Covert Action should dispel them.

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Olivia Hussey became an international celebrity at the young age of 17 when she landed the role of Juliet in Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet.

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"This very thick book makes a fast entertaining read that illuminates facts about the times on almost every page.

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In “The Accidental Rebel,” an op-ed published in The New York Times on the 40th anniversary of the Columbia student uprising of 1968, novelist Paul Auster (Columbia ’69) asserted that stud

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The Still Life Sketchbook is essentially a blank sketchbook with outstanding illustrations designed to inspire and stimulate productivity in the budding artist.

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“The Order of the Day is smug, self-important, and pedestrian history.”

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"A Fierce Glory offers spectacle over detail to the benefit of understanding."

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“If you love animals and are inspired by fine art, this book is a gem. This collection is elegant, simple, and rich with emotion.”

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If ever there was or is a book that presents a conundrum for a reviewer, this is it; Stephanie Pfriender Stylander: The Untamed Eye is a mystery in so many ways. 

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If you are a fan of Marc Jacobs and his body of work as a designer then it would behoove you to run, not walk, to buy this book.

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“a valuable and blessedly concise addition to the literature.”

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Do not be misled by the title of the book as most prospective readers will be expecting a large monograph filled with a plethora of glossy images using clothes from the Chanel archive.

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“To Survive on This Shore radically widens the range of visible trans experiences.

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Bloomsbury’s Object Lessons series offers small, pocket-sized books big on ideas and insights into the theoretical and cultural implications of everyday objects.

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“Lisa Brennan-Jobs is a very good writer who has somehow managed to dredge up debilitating memories without feeling sorry for herself. It’s a compelling read.”

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In November 1849, Cambridge, Massachusetts, was very much a sleepy town run by Harvard University.

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The topic of death and dying has gripped the publishing world for the past several years.

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“Wars are not won by evacuations,” remarked Winston Churchill after 338,226 British and French soldiers were safely transferred from the beaches at Dunkirk to England in late May-early June 1940.

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“This captivating story will sweep the reader through fascinating and glowing accounts of the great composer’s life . . .”

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“this book is an excellent companion to a survey of photography course, or as an introduction to the evolution of modern visions in photography.”

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In the decade before the Civil War two writers penned words that capture the erratic pulse of our American Experiment.

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Anyone seeking to understand the last years of the Cold War should read this book. The central figure is Oleg Gordievsky, now in his eighties and living in a (hopefully) safe house near London.

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“a crisply written, compelling narrative that highlights the roles of key U.S. policymakers such as Dean Acheson, George Marshall, Louis Johnson, and George Kennan.”

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