Nonfiction

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Claire Harman’s Murder by the Book begins in chaos and mystery: the body of 73-year-old aristocrat Lord William Russell is discovered in his own bed in his Mayfair mansion, hi

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Bruce Springsteen fans are like no other fans in the annals of rock ’n’ roll, though it would not be easy to describe them. They come in many shapes and sizes, and belong to different generations.

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“[this] story about Pura Belpré is pura alegría—pure joy!”

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“Inhuman Land is a vivid lesson of what that war entailed, conveyed with an artist’s eye, and well worth reading.”

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“Shaughnessy’s work is a highly original look at the world as it is today and the dangers we seem intent on inflicting upon ourselves.

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Ilya Kaminsky’s second book of poetry, Deaf Republic, contains some of the most exquisite lines you’ll find in contemporary poetry, lines that vibrate with soft-spoken yet urgent, ethical

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“Masterly, vivid, dramatic. . . This is beautiful writing, visceral and deep.”

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“Imagine turning your head and holding your arm out, as if for a blood test.

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“Daring Dozen is a beautiful tribute to exploration and discovery, commemorating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s historic lunar landing . . .”

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Hal Brands and Charles Edsel, distinguished professors with real world experience in the US Department of State, present what they and others see as lessons drawn from the glory and demise of Athen

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Summer Brennan takes on much more than just the high heel.

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“Doing Justice is an essential read for every American who cares about the rule of law and the pursuit of justice in the United States, particularly at a time when

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By 1914 Europeans ruled 84% of the globe. How did they do it? Eleven hundred years ago Europe was a backwater.

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Rebecca Earle, a professor in history at the University of Warwick, intellectualizes the history of potatoes to portray the tuber’s entanglement with the emergence of modernity, the birth of the li

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“The book’s strong point is in its critique of advertising and that industry’s relationship with baseball as a reflection of the changes, for good and bad, in American society.

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“Benaïm is the grandest of storytellers who pulls you into the subject’s life and makes you believe you, too, were actually eavesdropping on Yves Saint Laurent.”

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“Thin Blue Lie fails to convince us that ‘technologies adopted by law enforcement have actually made policing worse . .

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“Little Boy will delight you again and again. It is rich and playful poetry disguised as a novel, and it is pure Ferlinghetti.”

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What remains not unsaid but unresolved is the team’s final question: Is religion potentially, latently, or equally dangerous?”

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When US Army Private Bowe Bergdahl went outside the wire of his military basecamp in Afghanistan in 2009, and wandered around to talk to the enemy, he was within hours captured by the Taliban.

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“there is much to instruct and delight in the delineation of the ways in which the lives of these unusual women are reflected in their work.”

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Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness’ The Passion Paradox aims “to show you how you can find and cultivate passion and how you can manage its immense power for good.” The authors note, justifia

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"A page-turner illustrated with maps, paintings, and photographs, The Aleutians takes the reader to the action there in 1942 and 1943."

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“Holly van Leuven has written an exhaustively researched, well-written chronicle of Bolger’s life and career.

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“In The Trial of Lizzie Borden, Robertson displays her writing and researching skills in this piece of creative nonfiction that reads almost as a novel.

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