Nonfiction

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Do Something for Nothing is no real reflection of the magnanimity of the project behind it.

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“Gross and Daley’s photographs tell a story, a deeply important story . . .”

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They say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. But They aren’t here and They don’t matter, anyway. 

 

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"Sometimes one fingers annihilation," he writes in a quiet moment of nuclear bombing, "before breaking into bliss."

Delight, Parnassians. Arthur Sze has returned.

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“the US military is again neglecting the lessons learned from the last 20 years of conflict in the messy and uncertain fields of insurgency and asymmetric wars to return to the more familia

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“Armed with the insight and lessons from her youth, the author emerged as a bright young college student who learned to love herself for who she was and who she has yet to become.”

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Lobe Your Brain is a colorful book about how your brain works. Although it is laid out like a 32-page picture book, it’s really for older kids, ages five and up.

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What if all that was needed to stave off an impending mass extinction of life on Earth was to set aside half the planet for nature?

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Pop-Up Moon is gorgeously illustrated by Annabelle Buxton with stunning paper-engineering by Olivier Charbonnel.

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“Russo provides a well-illustrated essay on each of these individuals, reminding the reader that the presidents and the White House have families, and their history becomes part of America’

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“Many readers will wonder what future generations will make of this sad and epic account of failed national leadership during a health catastrophe.

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“A wonderfully poignant and intimate behind-the-scenes portrayal of George H. W. Bush’s post-presidential life and accomplishments.”

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“Readers seeking a sterile understanding of profanity with all the lewdness and bawdiness sanitized away and air-brushed out will likely find Nasty Words beyond their comfort zone.

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Jesse Singal says his “book is an attempt to explain the allure of fad psychology, why that allure is so strong, and how both individuals and institutions can do a better job of resisting it.”

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Tiger in the Sea is ultimately an inspiring, uplifting book, with multiple heroes.”

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“In editing and republishing Ethel’s Love-Life, Christopher Looby has demonstrated how profoundly ahead of her time Margaret Sweat could be.

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“Reading Limón’s new book, The Carrying, is as startling and as easy as walking into an unexpected, haunted room in a house you thought you already knew.”

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“In Eva and Eve, Julie Metz reminds her readers that time and opportunity are not infinite, and that good people must be ever vigilant in opposing tyranny.”

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“Brown provides an exemplary piece of history, thoroughly researched and presented as a coherent, compelling story.”

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“does a marvelous job of presenting this nearly forgotten military action in the context of early 20th century of Mexican and American politics . . .”

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“Justice Deferred offers a needed refresher course for faded memories on the Supreme Court’s unequal history with one of the key issues not only of our day, but on

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“When Mezzanine anchors itself, when its persona raises her head and shows the way, it’s a marvellous and startling collection.”

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It was probably a very good idea not to include the words “aura reading” in the title of this book, even though that is 100 percent what it is about.

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