Nonfiction

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

The Story of Art is an excellent way to get up to speed on what the history of art is all about.” 

Reviewed by: 

Sebastian Junger’s journey through the murky labyrinth of the near-death experience begins with an eerie series of events, if not premonitions, as if he was preparing for his death while fighting f

Reviewed by: 

“Although the subtitle of the book credits Churchill with the fight to save civilization, in the end Dugard makes clear that is was the courageous pilots of the RAF . . .”

Reviewed by: 

This is, depending on how you look at the oeuvre, Patti Davis’ fifth book about her parents, the Reagans, though you only learn about one of the others from the “Also by Patti Dav

Reviewed by: 

Between Two Trailers will keep you reading, just as Hillbilly Elegy and The Glass Castle did. The author has quite the story to tell . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Today, we require individuals with strength of spirit over the banality of evil, bravery over the malicious, and empathy for victims of hatred and lies.

Reviewed by: 

Clausewitz’s quote—"War is not a mere act of policy but a true political instrument, a continuation of political activity by other means”—is certainly true in the 21st century, and nowhere truer th

Reviewed by: 

“The author’s writing is colorful and lively, as befits this story of a special frontier place and its incredible creators.”

Reviewed by: 

“When I was growing up my mum would often make Krambosoupa, which translates as cabbage soup,” writes Georgina Hayden in the introduction to her recipe for hard cabbage, lemon and rice soup.

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“presents a smorgasbord of museum options and, through words and imagery, suggests the potential opportunity for an enjoyable, interesting sojourn.”

Reviewed by: 

There are days when it’s difficult to believe Ntozake Shange is dead. She died on October 27, 2018, in Bowie, Maryland.

Reviewed by: 

The old saying goes, “Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” The same could be said for writing about food, given the proclivities of human taste buds.

Reviewed by: 

“presents D-Day history not as some sweeping battle narrative, but as the thousands of individuals stories that collectively decided the course of the battle that day.”

Reviewed by: 

Many people may have read the articles, tweets, or even previous books of New York Times journalist Nicholas D Kristof but Chasing Hope is his first autobiography.

a critical read for AI leaders and ethicists, entrepreneurs and investors, journalists and concerned coders.”

the authors hope the lived experiences here will boost our understanding of ‘how much courage it takes to endure the daily struggles for continued or improved mental healt

Reviewed by: 

The fathers and mothers who came home from World War II suffered from some reentry problems (see the 1946 film The Best Years of Our Lives) but for the most part these members of the Great

Reviewed by: 

“The question of whether the United States will live up to Abraham Lincoln’s ideal of ‘a government of the people, by the people and for the people’ is the defining fight of our time.”

Reviewed by: 

“This fabulous book loaded with lavish photographs of the tapestries and arms and armor . . .

Reviewed by: 

“anyone with a passion for scarves might find it a lovely gift and charming reference.”

Reviewed by: 

“The Shooter at Midnight offers a deep look into the criminal justice system, with all its warts, and reveals that the system is only as good as the people who ope

Reviewed by: 

“a thorough and candid assessment of a great actor’s life and enduring influence.”

Reviewed by: 

“Conefrey tackles the man, the mission, and the myth of George Mallory, starting with his childhood and boyish love of adventure, leading to his untimely, and youthful, death . .

Reviewed by: 

The world and our perception is no longer reliable as previously dark undercurrents bubble up to the surface and sweep away all that just a few pages earlier seemed normal.

Pages