Nonfiction

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“Engaging, gorgeous, and thought provoking, this massive tome is a truly landmark example of the synergy between military history and the visual arts.”

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Should one be inclined to search, there is a plethora of titles published on this subject since the end of World War II.

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One of our era’s most popular artists and a leading art critic take us on a tour from cave paintings  to computer drawings.

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“this is a fun and personal book if you want to experiment with Moroccan flavors and eat some delicious preparations accompanied by wonderful photos of the finished dishes.”

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It is easy to guess that the author of An Anarchy of Chilies, Caz Hildebrand, is also a book designer.

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“it is projects like Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker that will continue to add to the collective intrigue.”

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is a branch of computer science devoted to creating computer systems that perform tasks characteristic of human intelligence. And one of the hottest questions around AI

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“poems of balanced wildness and instinctual grace.”

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“Playing to the Gods is a useful entry into the careers and lives of these two extraordinary artists.”

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There have been two excellent, lengthy biographies of director-choreographer Jerome Robbins: Deborah Jowitt’s Jerome Robbins and Amanda Vaill’s Somewhere: A Life of Jerome Robbins

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“After learning about 45 of these creatures, it’s impossible not to go back to the book to enjoy it over and over again..”

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“a very accomplished piece of sport history and a very good read for any fan of the game.”

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“My aim in this book,” writes Polish historian Adam Zamoyski in his captivating new biography of Napoleon Bonaparte, “is not to justify or condemn, but to piece together his life . . .

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In the 21st century, Americans take for granted that U.S. presidents exercise broad war-making powers. U.S.

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“littered with genuinely brilliant poems. They could lure disenchanted rationalists back to poetry. They might ignite a new movement in a culture. They are wonderful.”

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“The Grand Medieval Bestiary feels magical, valuable, and important.”

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National security correspondent for the Washington Post Greg Miller has written an up-to-date account of Donald Trump, Putin’s Russia, and the subversion of American democracy. 

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Somewhere in the middle of this revelatory and emotionally powerful memoir by Sally Field, she unpacks a story that is a case study in what Hollywood’s casting couch was like, even for an actress w

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“This is a small but beautiful book and one that deserves to be cherished.

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Carl von Clausewitz is best known for his magnum opus, On War, which has long been considered the standard for Western thought on war and strategy.  Although generations of graduate and wa

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The trope of the murdered “dead girl” serves as a catalyst for many popular crime narratives, from bestselling thrillers to limited TV series to true crime podcasts.

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Was it only seven years ago when self-referenced “veteran entertainment reporter” Sam Kashner teamed with biographer Nancy Schoenberger to produce that rock-’em, sock-’em tome Furious Love: Eli

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For those with even a rudimentary knowledge of pro football, names like Vince Lombardi and Bill Belichick may be familiar.

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"through this book of nonfiction snippets, however enlightening, the idea of the author seeing a much bigger picture emerges, one best told through the experience of the different parts."

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“The book is sure to inspire home cooks to try a hand at baking their own bread and churning fresh butter or spend time drooling over the scrumptious photographs.”

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