Nonfiction

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"Weisman here gives a solid outline of the history of Jewish divisiveness that anyone can follow, an important beginning to understanding the truth over myth about Judaism in American histo

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“Funny, romantic, utterly charming, Okay Fine Whatever will particularly appeal to people who suffer from anxiety. In other words, everyone.”

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“Young children are likely to connect with this book on several levels.”

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Sven-Eric Liedman’s A World to Win: The Life and Works of Karl Marx, is a remarkable and timely contribution and achievement.

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Jess Berry tries to convey to the reader the links between fashion, interiors (salons/shops) and modernism: (modern artistic or literary philosophy and practice; especially: a self-conscious break

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Kara Richardson Whitely’s double-entendre of a title, The Weight of Being, wonderfully captures her physical and emotional life as a person of higher weight.

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What possesses a mother to kill her children? This is an age-old question to a scenario that unfortunately happens too often.

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In 1997 Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) scholar Barthélémy Jobert published a monograph to honor the 200th birthday of this perplexing 19th century painter.

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The myths and allure of The Beat poets continues to intoxicate.

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The United States of America is home to over 3,000 jails. On any given day, these jails hold over 700,000 people. More than 12 million individuals pass through an American jail each year.

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What happens when the world’s greatest mystery writer is asked to solve a real murder? Not exactly what you would expect.

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“Alice Sparberg Alexiou makes us miss the Bowery— more than we ever knew we could.”

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“These poems glow with interiority—profound, intense, spiritual.”

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What can we learn about the current president of the United States from his children?

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“a powerful book that delves deep into a seriously deranged mind.”

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“let’s also turn back to myth, reframing our scientific narrative within the history of the stories we tell ourselves about what we’re still trying to understand.”

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In 1346 Edward of Woodstock commanded the frontline at the Battle of Crécy, his father King Edward III of England, intentionally left him unsupported to win the battle, so he could “earn his spurs”

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“The Boys of Fairy Town is an informative, entertaining, and often eye-opening book that examines the complexity of male queer culture in one of the nation’s most

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“Although science is under siege,” Offit writes toward the end of the book, “science advocates are fighting back.”

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David Lynch, Nudes by David Lynch is a lavishly produced book of contemporary photographic art.

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Learning a new language can be daunting, but Chineasy for Children makes it fun, if not exactly easy.

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First things first: Michèle Mendelssohn’s Making Oscar Wilde is not a biography.

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“For those willing to stomach the brutality, In the Name of the Children is a revelation and a testimony to the fact that some individuals cannot be cured.”

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“an unsettling resonance that more triumphantly framed survivor stories rarely achieve.”

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