Nonfiction

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Imagine that sequoias and cedars, lilies and laurels, even daffodils and daisies, and indeed all the plants of our green world formed their own vast and diverse country, one that spanned the Earth,

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Most savvy and informed fashion readers will be ecstatic with the content of The Perfect Imperfection of Golden Goose.

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“an engrossing portrait of the artist, his art, and his incorrigible personality.”

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“Our Team gloriously chronicles the excruciating birth pains and exhilarating triumph of a ballclub that played an undervalued but coequal role in challenging major league baseball's instit

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at once painful to read but vitally necessary if Americans are to understand the ‘widely ignored’ epidemic that affects millions in ways we still do not fully understand.”

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Rudyard Kipling—the Anglo Indian novelist, short story writer, and bard of the British Empire—must have known that it wasn't true when he wrote, "East is East, and West is West, and Never the twain

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To understand the challenges posed by Communist China, and the difficulties experienced by the United States in dealing with these challenges, there is probably no better book than Chaos Under

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“For its penetrating thought, its joyful language, and its eclectic wanderings among the peaks and valleys of high and low culture, this book is an act of sublime generosity from a brillian

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Boeing 737: The World’s Most Controversial Commercial Jetliner is handsomely published on coated paper that allows the amazing number of Boeing 737 photographs to look their best.

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“For the reader who is intrigued by America’s romance with gangsters, Tiger Girl and the Candy Kid is definitely worth spending time with a couple who, for just a short time, lived

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Derek Sheffield, a lifelong resident of the Pacific Northwest, is foremost a writer of compassion.

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There is a large discussion in the world of poetry about how to proceed with the expanding legion of what are derisively called “Instagram poets,” as comers from all corners argue about whether or

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There are two books folded inside one another in Adrienne Su’s Peach State. One is a cookbook. The other is a photo album. Neither has recipes. Neither has images.

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In the beginning, the Bible tells us, God created man in his image.

Early on in The Truth at the Heart of the Lie, former Catholic priest James Carroll announces three themes or stories he will tell.

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The challenge in reviewing a book of new and selected poems by a writer of Thomas Lynch’s caliber is that one might feel unequal to the task.

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If you have read only smaller portions of Dostoevsky, Christofi’s account will send you off to look for more.

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Naty Abascal: The Eternal Muse flings open the closet doors of Señora Abascal that contains treasures from the ’60s thru the present time and designed by everyone from Azzedine to Zuhair.

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A Light in the Dark by veteran film scholar and critic David Thompson is not so much a comprehensive history of film directors—that would take a much larger volume than this—as it is a ser

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A vast majority of devoted and knowledgeable readers or fashion followers could easily say it was the best of the times, it was the worst of times!

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Documentary photographer Donna Ferrato has been photographing women for at least 50 years, but Holy, her latest book, might just be her most personal one since the award-winning Living

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The Empathy Diaries should be required reading for men who care about the emotional landscape of women and the health of their own feminine side.”

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“Filled with vivid first-person accounts, Traveling Black is a superb history that captures a shameful aspect of the American story.”

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Human history is replete with secret societies and organizations like the Knights Templar and Freemasons.

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“The aim of Useful Delusions, a very readable book, is to teach us to be more rational about our irrationality, to not make the latter our enemy, but to recognize how it may help a

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