Nonfiction

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Yayoi Kusama: All About My Love showcases the imagery and portrays the artist’s personal story.”

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In the post-Charlottesville world where the President of the United States continues to enable these “very fine people” with a deliberate blind eye to the intensity of the

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In 1975 photographer James Klosty published the first ever book on the American choreographer Merce Cunningham, republished in 1986 and now in commemoration of Cunningham’s 100th birthday, Klosty h

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“It’s a ‘strange world.’ It’s one where politicians and corporations find it too expensive to save the planet.”

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Art history in the Golden Age is not the exclusive domain of Michelangelo’s Italy or Bruegel’s Netherlands. Other countries in Europe also produced prominent artists during that era.

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Rarely, if ever, has this reader come across a book of this genre that was as thoroughly annotated, enlightening, informative and just incredible on so many different levels.

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Xenophobia has had a long and sordid history in this country, as admirably pointed out by author Erika Lee in the text.

There is no question that Jacques Henri Lartigue is one of the leading figures of 20th century photography.

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This short book shows Toni Morrison’s “black girl magic,” as Zadie Smith writes in the Prologue. It shows her beauty.

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“Regan ends her memoir with a prayer. Then it is another day, and the reader is hopeful that Iliana will be just fine.”

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The History of Rock & Roll, Volume 2 delivers more than its share of amusing and revelatory anecdotal glories, while still adhering to its mission statement of identifying ess

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In his memoir, I Was Hitler’s Pilot, Hans Baur provides more insight into his love of flying than he does discussing his role as Hitler’s pilot.

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Ted Gioia's books on jazz, blues, and folk music are both scholarly and entertaining, and his latest volume Music: A Subversive History is perhaps his most ambitious.

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National Review Senior Editor Richard Brookhiser has written a thoughtful and elegant meditation on the American idea of liberty . . .”

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“This is not an easy journey, but neither has the evolution of humans from the savannahs of Africa to the surface of the moon been idyllic.”

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A military memoir filled with dark humor, Clint Emerson’s The Right Kind of Crazy builds a portrait of what it takes to work in special ops for two decades.

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“Simply put, Dan Buettner has written the ultimate manual for longevity.”

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“The Broken Road seeks not only to answer the ‘why’ of George Wallace’s behavior, but also to reconcile his legacy of bigotry and hatred, and subsequent redemption

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“A prolific writer and award-winning actor, John Lithgow has penned a laugh-out-loud picture of American politics at its worst.

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“Cahalan’s research is dogged and her narrative riveting, leading us from red herring to clue and back with the dexterity of the best mystery novelists.

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Secondhand tells an important story about consumerism gone wild, the complex industry that has grown around its detritus, and how we can push back on an entrenched culture of disp

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“Line after line and scene after scene delight the reader with its account of a world gone by but well worth the returning to, if only as a tourist.

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Mr. Know-It-All is an argument for deviance, performance, and shock.”

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“offers one of the most well-rounded, entertaining, and creative presentations of Gaugin biographies on the shelves.”

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