Nonfiction

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Secret City is a lengthy, detailed, riveting history of the way in which homosexuality was perceived and treated in our government from the tenure of Franklin D.

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Brown’s Jackson is a dueler, a ‘slaveholder, architect of Indian removal, and a critic of abolitionism.’”

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“Reading this book and using other books like it as teaching tools is critical, particularly in our current climate of racism and bigotry.

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“Warraich’s push to change the way we talk about pain and prescribe treatment is compelling, especially when he elaborates pain’s enculturation and acceptance of pain in our normal dialogue

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Returning to the flavors of his very earliest years, chef Peter Serpico was born in Seoul, Korea, and adopted when he was two.

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Bittersweet grants us permission to explore and experience sorrow and longing by transforming them into acceptable, inspiring, even hopeful emoti

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Even amid all his late-life venting in The Last Days, Geoff Dyer manages to please once again with his artful sentences and close observations.”

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“As Ever Green shows, the world is filled with people who bring a weathered idealism to their forests, where there’s much to learn and many successes to build on.”

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There’s something magical about the number 13: there are 13 stripes on the American flag, 13 is a prime and therefore indivisible number, in the Jewish calendar a leap year has 13 months and Steven

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“an excellent tale of the coming of age for America’s victorious World War II Army.”

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“This book stands out as a practical manual for practical people—how to accomplish an objective using the shortest, most concise written product possible.”   

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“America’s Rise and Fall Among Nations is a stinging critique of America’s foreign policy establishment and its Progressive ‘ruling class’ since 1910, and Codevill

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“Through his poems, Wasson has unearthed the buried bones of generations and brought their lives into the daylight.

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Often it’s the lyrics that Cantwell judiciously quotes and expertly contextualizes; at other times it's the imaginative, unerringly precise, and never-repeated wa

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considerable detective work, which overlooks few details. White has certainly written the definitive book on Jane Stanford’s death.”

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Can true Southern cuisine—think fried chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, macaroni and cheese, and fried okra—be transformed into healthier fare without losing the flavors and tastes that make this

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“Levin has written a book of adjustments—one that nearly resembles a sort of Delphic handbook on the transformation of self-concept.”

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A sometimes painful read, this revealing deep dive into George Floyd’s life places his tragic story in the broader context of race in America.”

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Lee Alexander McQueen: Mind, Mythos, Muse is not only the title of this book but also its raison d’être accompanying the exhibition of the same name, currently at the Los Angeles County Mu

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a fascinating and well-written piece, capturing this moment in hockey history.

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Hannah Höch is the paperback version of the catalog that accompanied a 2014 exhibition of Höch’s work in the Whitechapel Gallery, London.

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“It took the failure of many of our country’s institutions—schools, hospitals, law enforcement, social services, and the criminal justice system—to turn Sara Kruzan into a convicted killer.

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a spellbinding work that will serve James D. Hornfischer’s legacy well.”

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“The recipes in Let’s Go Nuts: 80 Vegan Recipes with Nuts and Seeds take the home cook on a seasonal culinary journey and are an essential guide for anyone wanting to learn how to

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This Much Is True is an entertaining, sometimes shocking, periodically uncomfortable, but altogether delightful read.”

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