Nonfiction

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“Applegate’s well written and exhaustively researched biography of Polly Adler offers unique insight into a remarkable immigrant as well as the Roaring ’20s.”

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“In her quiet, humble way, Goodall and her co-author have masterminded a full-bore assault on the cynicism, emotional exhaustion, and despair of living in a world in the throes of climate c

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“. . . essential for anyone wanting to know who Magritte was, as a person, a painter, and a thinker.”

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Versace: The Complete Collections is the chronological chronicle of two Versaces: Gianni, the eponymous founder, and his sister, Donatella, who took up the reins after Gianni’s untimely de

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“This sweeping and novel synthesis exploring the arc of the human condition— its highly diverse forms of political organizing, and the future that lays in store for us—may well prove to be

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Maggie Smith’s poetry collection Goldenrod emerges from a place of stillness.

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“provides a more nuanced picture of an almost tragic figure trying to bridge the old and new political order between representative democracy and the oligarchy of the English nobility.”

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“Simonovis’ succinct work and powerful lexicon carry the painful images of the hyper-reality of a totalitarian regime.

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“The real strength of The Approaching Storm is not its colorful and well-drawn supporting cast but the three pivotal figures at its center, who provide a remarkably revealing lens

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“One story that is far from convincing, showing not much of story’s fabled power at all.”

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The Writer’s Crusade is an important consideration of Kurt Vonnegut and the legacy of Slaughterhouse-Five.”

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“For sheer reading and reflecting pleasure, These Precious Days is a treasure.”

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Unless you’re deeply committed to a life of vegetables, phrases like plant-based can be a turnoff when it comes to menus and cookbooks.

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“a marvelous middle volume of this trilogy, picking up the narrative seamlessly and handing off to what promises to be a stirring conclusion to the war . . .”

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What do you do when the world refuses to look at you, to really see you? When, still, your life is expendable if the smallest excuse for taking it can be conjured?

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There’s a lot to argue with in Joseph Horowitz’s Dvorák’s Prophecy and the Vexed Fate of Black Classical Music.

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In the past few months, there has been a plethora of reports from all levels and categories of sports, revealing case after case of racism, sexism, sexual harassment, sexual violence, misogyny, hom

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“A reader, even one familiar with the history of the American Revolution, will find much to enjoy in this book with interesting details to learn.”

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“a well-written, well-argued book about how we can make a real difference in preventing suicide by challenging the assumptions we have about why people kill themselves and addressing oursel

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“A Poetics of the Press serves an audience of those dedicated to recording and understanding literary publishing, a must for all serious libraries.”

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It is about time that this man is celebrated and recognized with a book devoted to his extraordinary talents.

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“Gayle Jessup White writes a candid and personal memoir that includes finding the legacy of President Thomas Jefferson and the author’s racial self-identity in the process.”

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“the five days from the Japanese assault on Pearl Harbor to Adolf Hitler’s declaration of war on the United States were among the most fraught, but remain some of the least understood, of t

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“the kind of poetry that can make a reader wince with delight.”

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