Nonfiction

Reviewed by: 

Sarah Ditum’s book covers a period that she refers to as the “long aughts,” lasting roughly from Britney Spear’s famous 1998 song of “Baby One More Time,” until March 2013 with the release by Robin

Reviewed by: 

“Golway’s lively and insightful narrative does much to illuminate La Guardia’s enduring impact on New York City and the relevance of his grand and inclusive social vision a century later.”

Reviewed by: 

In her introduction to Divine Might: Goddesses in Greek Myth, Nathalie Haynes reflects on the view explored in her publication, that we humans create gods in our own image (rather than the

Reviewed by: 

Practical Optimism is very solid in its ideas and methods—comprehensive in about every way, . . .”

Reviewed by: 

It is probably fair to say that even the most avid fashionista is not aware that the Kering group—a multinational corporation that owns everything from Gucci to Alexander McQueen to Yves Saint Laur

Author(s):
Illustrator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Annie Londonderry had never ridden a bike. She was a mother of three and a hard-working salesperson for newspaper ads.

Reviewed by: 

Looking at Mexico / Mexico Looks Back is a slim, bilingual coffee table book highlighting the photography of Janet Sternburg, a woman far better known for her writing.

Reviewed by: 

Despite the horrific racism he’d seen, suffered, and fought against, John Lewis never allowed his heart to be consumed by hate.

Reviewed by: 

“Opanike’s book is small . . . but each page is filled with interesting detail, some humor, and some dark descriptions, proving that small can be as valuable as large.”

Reviewed by: 

“In True Believer, Traub traces not just Hubert Humphrey’s life but the rise and fall of mid-20th century liberalism with all of its courage, promise, triumphs, contradictions, com

Reviewed by: 

“A Murder in Hollywood shines a bright light into the dark crevices of Hollywood at a time when #MeToo wasn’t even something that was dreamed about, much less utte

Reviewed by: 

Author Dan Callahan specializes in big biographies of stars such as Barbara Stanwyck and Vanessa Redgrave. He profiled Alfred Hitchcock, looked at the art of screen acting, and wrote a novel, too.

Reviewed by: 

“The author calls Billie ‘the consummate performer whose gift was her ability to make a listener experience the emotion she was feeling as she sang a song.’”

Reviewed by: 

“This scholarship, written as a clear, engaging narrative, inspires the reader to take the ideas presented in Life After Power to look at other post-presidency lives.”

Reviewed by: 

“A dynamite cultural history account that focuses laser-like on the fraught translation of Edward Albee’s 1962 searing stage play about marriage . . .

Reviewed by: 

Churchill had laid the groundwork for the courtship of America decades before World War II by forging an American network of friendly and influential elites to promote Bri

Reviewed by: 

a comprehensive volume capturing the Lardner style and offering a considerable insight into America’s favorite sportswriter.”

Reviewed by: 

“It's one thing to have a great idea (liberal education) and altogether another for these ambitious start-ups to survive and thrive. Remarkably, they do so.”

Reviewed by: 

“Although the ideas in this book aren’t new, they bear repeating if readers are ever going to discard the no-pain-no-gain, just-do-it thinking that permeates our culture.”

Reviewed by: 

“The stories in this little book offer entertaining adventures beyond history that has gone unrecognized.”

Reviewed by: 

“The author’s conclusions on the long-term effect of the intervention on Russia’s current internal political and foreign policy viewpoint is fascinating.”

Reviewed by: 

“The Bishop and the Butterfly reads like a cross between a whodunnit and a political expose. . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“In Alt-Nature, Morgan deviates from mainstream representations of nature in a masterful re-tooling of vision and perception.”

Reviewed by: 

“most importantly, Twitty reminds us that you don’t have to be Black or Jewish to love koshersoul.”

Pages