Nonfiction

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"Spying on the South . . . goes deeper, darker, and makes stronger ties between the past and the present South than other of Horwitz's works."

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The Digital Plenitude: The Decline of Elite Culture and the Rise of New Media by Jay David Bolter is a book about exactly that: the decline of one thing and the rise of another.

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“This book will be a hard pill to swallow for many in the United States and the West. It raises uncomfortable moral dilemmas and exposes Western weaknesses. . . .”

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For as long as fashion has been recorded, there has always been one topic that is ever present and it is whether or not fashion is an art.

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“The reader will leave this charming book with the sound of Babe’s raucous laughter in mind . . . Babe Giese was a character, and one anyone should be pleased to get to know.”

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“Eating good food can be joyful, emotional, and even spiritual. Sharing it with others can be a universal commonality that allows people to connect with one another.”

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Andrea Antinori has written a complete book about every kind of whale out there. Did you know that dolphins belong to the whale family?

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The Apology is a personal story of sexual, physical, and psychological abuse. It is also about healing. It’s a controversial approach to healing, and the author is unaware.

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This is a serious and engaging book about a serious business—learning as much as possible about an adversary through HUMINT—intelligence gathered covertly by human agents.

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“David's eventual self-transformation as he rises above his upbringing makes for an empowering memoir.”

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“David Maraniss digs deep into his father’s 1952 blacklisting and emerges with a riveting account of what disloyalty charges did to families in the McCarthy era, a profound meditation on wh

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“Darwin worked only ‘a couple of hours a day and spent a lot of time taking long walks.’ Just imagine yourself doing the same. ‘How fun would that be?’”

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"D'Angour writes for a general audience without losing the reader or the subject of Socrates in Love: the complexities of Greek philosophy."

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“This exhibition is surely a testament to the longevity and influence of Hockney himself. . . .

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Valerie Jarrett of Chicago was described by the New York Times as “the ultimate Obama Insider.”

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“In 2014, Roger Angell was in Cooperstown at the Baseball Hall of Fame to receive the J. G.

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“Had Harper Lee completed The Reverend, would it have become the unparalleled great American true crime book? We’ll never know.

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“Emotions are not positive or negative but must be used appropriately in situations—through neither under- nor overuse—to be effective.”

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“John Douglas walks into rooms most of us would shun in our worst nightmares and comes back with remarkable insight into what type of person perpetrates such horrible acts.”

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“Williamson’s message and campaign seem merely aspirational.”

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“Cimarron: Freedom and Masquerade delivers on multiple levels.

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“an engaging overview of these highly trained warriors.”

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“It has been 15 years since Ronald Reagan’s death and more than 30 years since he left the White House, yet most historians and biographers continue to misunderstand the man and the reasons

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We’ve all heard of Auschwitz, the World War II Nazi death camp in southern Poland. The statistics are daunting: 1.1 million men, women, and children murdered, 900,000 of them Jews.

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