Nonfiction

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“The aim of Useful Delusions, a very readable book, is to teach us to be more rational about our irrationality, to not make the latter our enemy, but to recognize how it may help a

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“We Are Bellingcat reveals the power within each one of us to pierce the walls of disinformation and learn the truth about what’s happening out there.”

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Secrets are at the center of Derek DelGaudio’s memoir A Moral Man. There are the secrets he chooses to keep and the ones he decides to reveal.

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“Seuss has created a technically exquisite, beautifully painful book.”

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“Humans have probably been extinguishing bird species for thousands of years,” writes Michelle Nijhuis in her absorbing history of species conservation, Beloved Beasts.

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"Every photo is almost a fiction or a dream,” wrote Sylvia Plachy, the longtime photographer for the Village Voice. If it's really good, it's another form of life."

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Inette Miller has the distance and detachment of a journalist trained to see the big picture—and the heart of a woman who understands what it is like to be “the other.” It is these differing perspe

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“a carefully crafted and concisely arranged assortment of diverse interviews of high school students in which they attempt to explain the challenges of circumnavigating a rapidly transformi

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“I would like to be remembered as someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability.” —Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Professor Denise Duhamel is a prolific poet and the author of several books.

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The Food of Oaxaca: Recipes and Stories from Mexico’s Culinary Capital is right about Oaxaca, if arguably so.

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Trauma doesn’t develop only from violent incidents. It can manifest through institutional racism, the stress of cultural bias, or the isolation of pandemic.

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“introduces young readers to women who broke the strictures of their times to do extraordinary things”

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“In The Road Less Traveled, Zelikow brilliantly tells the diplomatic story of what he calls ‘the lost peace’ of August 1916–January 1917.”

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“Gerhardt is fluent in Lincoln history and political philosophy, but he stays close to his aspiration for the book—not to cover every event, but to demonstrate how an untutored, Western, sm

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Within an overall historical event are the individual stories.

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Do you want to know why many of the least affluent Americans support politicians who struggle to lower taxes for the rich and cut what they call the “death tax” on the assets that billionaires seek

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In just 170 pages Isabel Allende manages to write a humorous memoir, an homage to her family, all of whom seem to have walked off the pages of her delicious novels, and a feminist plea for women’s

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This book might have been subtitled An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing.

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Aahh . . . the halcyon days of the ’70s when New York City and the world was planet disco.

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Any movie goer, magazine reader, or fashion aficionado knows that fashion plays an essential and integral part of the storyline in any film.

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“The reader is left feeling thoroughly informed and deeply knowledgeable, newly created as a person with rich insight into the universe.”           

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“’Being an opera singer was fun, but the people on Bank Street, caring for and about each other, taught me what it means to be human.’”

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“a campaign history from this war that is engaging, insightful, and compelling . . .”

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