Debbra Palmer

Debbra Palmer's poetry has appeared in Calyx Journal, Portland Review, and other journals, as well as several literary anthologies, including His Hands, His Tools, His Sex, His Dress: Lesbian Writers on their Fathers (Alice Street Editions) and Present Tense and A Fierce Brightness, 25 Years of Women’s Poetry (Calyx Press).

Her poetry reviews have appeared in Prairie Schooner, and she was a reader and researcher for a book review program on Boise public radio.

Her graphic memoir in comics, Holy Frigidaire, was published through a grant from the Alexa Rose Foundation in 2021.

She earned a BS in Arts and Letters from Portland State University with a minor in writing and an MFA in poetry from Pacific University.

Currently, she is a writing instructor at the College of Western Idaho. She has also worked in communications and marketing with companies and organizations including Nike, Intel, Comcast, and Boise State University. 

She lives in Idaho's Treasure Valley with her wife.

Book Reviews by Debbra Palmer

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“In Alt-Nature, Morgan deviates from mainstream representations of nature in a masterful re-tooling of vision and perception.”

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Graywolf Press, renowned for its commitment to publishing a rich array of high-quality literature spanning essays, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, is marking its 50th anniversary this year.

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“This somewhat tongue-in-cheek narrative will captivate even the skeptics, directing their gaze upward at night.” 

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I Must Be Dreaming is your ticket to the dreamland of a genius.”

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“McCrae shows us how we need new music and new ears and eyes.”

As the whole world asked, “Can anyone explain this strange feeling,” a poet raised his hand.

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“So many trained poems of reason in one volume create a real treasure.”

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Winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize, Lo, a striking collection of poems by Melissa Crowe, is a pick-it-up-and-read-it straight-through collection, an “OMG, OMG!” page-turner.

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Don't Call Me Home reads acutely; Auder's descriptive account is visceral and not withholding.”

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these are a storyteller’s poems.”