Medical Writing

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“gripping . . . find out how American taxpayers, insurance premium payers, and patients are literally getting mistreated. . . . No one is spared.

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“Overall disorganization makes Why Millions Died: Before the War on Infectious Diseases read more like a collection of thoughts and excerpts left over from many years of an interes

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“Make reading The Human Right to Health a priority—if for nothing else than to consider some of the questions around the influence of private foundations and their public accountab

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“The Origins of AIDS is a fascinating and important read that tells how it came to be that over 60 million global citizens are either now infected or have died of HIV.”

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“Funny, informative, and irreverent, Me, My Cells, and I is perfect bedtime reading for a recently diagnosed prostate cancer patient—no matter what stage of disease is involved.”

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“Parents of children who have been diagnosed as belonging to one of these groups and adults who have been living with any of these labels will find positive affirmation and encouraging advi

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“. . . riveting from start to finish. . . .

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“Kathleen Sharp’s writing style leads the reader effortlessly through this horrifying saga of deceit, greed, and human destruction. . . .

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“Anyone with a curious mind who wants to boost his or her scientific literacy will enjoy Viruses: A Very Short Introduction. In bite-sized fashion, baseline knowledge gets built an

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“Combining information from unpublished memoirs, interviews, and archival materials, Ms.

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“Nicholas James has managed the impossible. In one short book he satisfies several different audiences well.

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Although laughter may be the best medicine, what saves medicine? When a patient is counting on their healthcare system to help them, what has and will continue to help medicine do its job well?

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In Surviving After Cancer: Living the New Normal, Anne Katz provides ample evidence that cancer changes everything.

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The Hippocratic oath, “I will enter only for the good of my patients”, challenges doctors to resist market pressures and social expectations.

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Everything Is Obvious is sectioned into two parts, the first, Common Sense, deals with the recognition that commonsense is anything but, and explores various types of errors in commonsense

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Popular psychology books seem to always sell big. In many large bookstores they have their own section labeled self-help or psychology.

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In a crime investigation, a police detective usually asks, “Who had the means, motive, and the opportunity to commit this crime?” In the book Profiling: The Psychology of Catching Killers,

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The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) passed in the Congress this past March.

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Esther Gokhale runs a wellness center in Palo Alto, California, where she has been teaching her method for over fifteen years.

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Norman Doidge’s book, The Brain That Changes Itself, helps to usher in a new branch of brain science called neuroplasticity.

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When author B. Lynn Goodwin became the primary caregiver of her elderly mother, she turned to writing as a form of therapy. In her book, You Want Me To Do What?

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In The Pox and the Covenant, Tony Williams challenges readers to reevaluate everything they thought they knew about colonial America, the Puritans, and science.

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This begins as an excellent biography of a woman who might have remained unknown but for a miracle of medicine.

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