Photographers

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50 Contemporary Photographers You Should Know is meant to be a Who’s Who of current influential photographers with the assumption that anyone who cares about contemporary photogra

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Edward Burtynsky’s aerial photographs in Essential Elements go beyond the kind of satellite images and views that Google Earth has made commonplace in recent years.

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A photographic publication of any historical event is to be welcomed, and the Second World War was one of the most widely covered and photographed conflicts in history.

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Benjamin Grant has created a unique series of images in Overview: A New Perspective of Earth, which illustrates that “there needs to be a dramatic shift in the way our species views our pl

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“the book succeeds as a primer for new photographers and inspiration for experienced lovers of photography.”

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“[a] stylish and intelligent discussion of the intersection of transportation, aesthetics, and meaning.”

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Franck Bohbot’s color photography in Light on New York City captures the iconic and not so-iconic places in New York City at night.

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Every now and again a book falls into your lap that refuses to be ignored. Your fingers, seemingly with a mind of their own, open the cover and begin to turn the pages.

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Regardless of genre and subject matter Peter Gravelle is one of the great storytellers of our time.

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For those of us who love the exuberance of Robin Williams’ stand-up comedy and enjoy his movies and the way they make us laugh (The Birdcage), or consider the absurdity of war (Good Mo

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Popular culture’s visual imaginaries of traditional Native Americans tend to exotic representations of a vanished people.

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This is the second in a series of books profiling Magnum photographers, the powerhouse that probably changed photography and photographers forever.

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Neil Leifer discovered "a camera could be my ticket to everywhere. A kind of magic carpet . . . to anyplace I wanted to go." That camera took him to fascinating places.

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Revealing the true personality of a portrait sitter has always been the challenge for photographers since the early daguerreotypes or for painters over the past 3,000 years.

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Often risking her own safety, Chilean photographer Paz Errázuriz chronicled the lives of her fellow Chileans who were oppressed, confined, and otherwise cast out citizens during the brutal military

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Minor White was a poet, writer, educator, curator and photographer whose impact on photography was immeasurable.

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In Tiny: Streetwise Revisited, the photographer Mary Ellen Mark chronicles the life of “Tiny” (Erin Charles), a street kid from Seattle.

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Mohan Bhasker is a physician in Los Angeles as well as a nature photographer of artistry and daring.

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India by Steve McCurry is a book of first impressions that are intense and heartfelt.

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Louis Stettner's Penn Station, New York is not a photo book about the grandeur or architecture of the original Pennsylvania station—which should have been declared a landmark but instead w

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In 1962 Joel Meyerowitz was a junior art director at a New York City advertising agency.

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Fine art photography is driven by concepts.

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Lunchtime, time for lunch, take a breather, grab a bite, make a call, run an errand . . . Charles H.

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British poet Philip Larkin’s unconventional life and career is revealed in unique fashion in Richard Bradford’s The Importance of Elsewhere, a volume of photographs by the poet, who consid

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Ekphrastic poetry utilizes the medium of verse to address, to interpret, and to transliterate another art form.

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