U.S.

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“Beyond classrooms, general readers will likely find a few of the selections compelling and the rest boorish and preachy.

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“Accessible to both undergraduates and postgraduates, this is an excellent statistical study.

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“While the two narratives— Lynne Cox’s and Amundsen’s—could be complementary, in South with the Sun they seem to be somewhat at odds with each other, as the only common ground betw

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“Mr. Pelton has sharpened his pen and plugged into individual contractor units to bring us this candid take on the behind-the-scenes players in warfare.”

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Here, at the beginning of the 21st century, Noah Webster is an often overlooked fixture of American culture to a modern audience.

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When The Great Recession hit, Americans returned to their kitchens and the classics started to make a comeback.

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When a notorious Italian assassin and his wife are found stuffed in a barrel and floating down the Thames River, Scotland Yard puts out a call to Inquiry Agent Cyrus Barker to assist them in foilin

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Part biography, part multimedia art smorgasbord, John’s Secret Dreams: The Life of John Lennon is more than just a nonfiction picture book: It’s a work of art itself.

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This novel is a real-time, disturbing blitzkreig. It is also an important, exhausting, and challenging book about our army during today’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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The Icarus Syndrome uses the Greek myth of Icarus to illustrate American foreign policy shortcomings following World War I, Vietnam, and Iraq.

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Under the command of General Joe Johnston, the Army of Tennessee blocked Union General Sherman’s invasion of Georgia and his move toward Atlanta.

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H. Donald Winkler has researched the lives of nineteen daring women who changed the outcome of Civil War battles.

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This large format book is no coffee table artifact. A lively text by the Los Angeles Public Library’s map archivist, Glen Creason, along with an introduction by fellow native D. J.

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Those of us who grew up in the age of early television sometimes wonder whatever happened to this or that character.

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“Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope.

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