Regional & Cultural

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“It is somewhere in the fearful and joyful fragility of love where Matthew Zapruder’s readers are brought ‘to that place beyond words.’”

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fine literature, from beyond the borders of the English-speaking sensibilities.

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“Harjo evokes images, emotions, and places in a poetic biography of family perseverance. She proves sentiment.”

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“Eve L. Ewing has achieved what the historian cannot. She has restored the blood and sweat to the historical record of a tragic moment in the history of the nation.”

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“The sheer heft of the two volumes only hints at the vast poetical output of Ammons, a variegated array of poeticules and epics, intimate confessions and scientific hymns, wordplay and wond

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“Harrison’s poetry transcends pedestrian landscapes to inspire sentimental memories, as if epiphanies.”

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Appropriately, given the current challenges faced by women of color, the last few years have seen a resurgence and a reclaiming of the contributions of non-white, non-binary feminist poets.

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“He who learns must suffer.

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“Landau’s deft touch allows her to shape poems of subtle nuance and strength, poems that build paradox upon paradox . . .”

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“In that larger tradition of transcendent art, if we let them into our hearts, these new poems from Jericho Brown will awe and unsettle us.”

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“this is a book by a talented teller who tells his tales with love for his reader, cleverly but responsibly (never cheating literature), the beauty and imagery of the verse providing a thor

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“perhaps Dawson is a gardener, gently lifting away weeds and leaving the reader ready for the seeds she will sow.”

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“Bly writes with a naturalist’s eye and sage view to derive permanent human emotions from natural beauty. . . . an honor to read.”

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“How the End First Showed is not merely a collection of Nigerian poems, it is an effort to forge transnational literature.”

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“The natural and gritty images paint dynamic landscapes that balance myth and reality.”

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In the September 26, 2002, issue of The New York Review of Books, in an article rather marvelously entitled “The Queen of Quinkdom,” Margaret Atwood tackled Ursula K. Le Guin.

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“littered with genuinely brilliant poems. They could lure disenchanted rationalists back to poetry. They might ignite a new movement in a culture. They are wonderful.”

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“This is deep music and clear, as the poet carries us to those places in the heart that ground and guide us.

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Reading Ezra Pound can be a demanding experience as he often slips into French, Spanish, Italian, or ancient Greek—using the Greek alphabet of course.