Women’s Fiction

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“Pure pleasure from first page to last. . . . All the joys of writing are richly displayed here, as is all their power to evoke and hold close.”

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Starting over is difficult, but sometimes it is necessary. Olivia McFee learns this the hard way.

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“Lauren Denton unfurls a mystery by reconciling a buried past with a modern-day story set in a town with vibrant characters brimming with Southern charm.”

Wry, sly, and nicely dry, Kate Atkinson’s 13th outing is stuffed with runaway waifs, toffs, female pickpockets, “merry maid” hostesses, bent coppers, murdered girls, a melancholy detective, an intr

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Debut author Bobby Finger wields crisp, bright language in succinct, ample prose to reveal secrets deliberately hidden from the norms of social order. . . .

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“incandescent”

The narrator of Yiyun Li’s newest book is Agnes, but she insists the story she tells isn’t really about her, but about her best friend Fabienne:

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“Cruz has created an unforgettable character in Cara. And readers will feel like they’ve made a new, fascinating friend.”

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“the thoughtful writing and masterful portraits of flawed people and their struggle for survival in a dystopian world is elegant and rewarding.”

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“Brilliantly conceived. . . . There are court intrigues, whispered rumors, a clever subplot about the power of painting, what it reveals as well as what it hides . . .

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“an intellectually engaging and psychologically probing novel about a family returning from a dark place to a better one.”

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To understand and appreciate this novel, you need to move past any aversion you might have to the idea of female killers. Women as paid assassins, murderers for hire . . .

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“McCall Smith is an author who sees his characters and their world, fully and tenderly. And that makes for a book that is as comforting to sink into as well-worn armchair.”

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Louisa Treger opens her historical novel about the life of intrepid reporter Nellie Bly in 1887 as she arrives on Blackwell Island, home of the notorious women’s insane asylum.

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“a quick read . . . easily digested . .  .”

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“lyrical beauty of Manfredi’s prose . . . at its heart, The Empire of Dirt is a rich puzzle impossible to resist.”

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“This is a very funny, easy to read novel that has an edge thanks to its main character’s charade.”

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“tightly crafted women’s fiction, with a sensitive look at love, conscience, and loyalty.”

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C. J. Carey’s novel, Widowland, couldn’t be more chilling—or dystopian—given the frightening political landscape confronting women in America and elsewhere.

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The writing is so smooth and consistent, and the narrative unfolds so steadily, it’s hard to look up from.”

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It is April 1943, and World War II is raging throughout Europe. In Washington, D.C., Ava Harper is working as a librarian at a job she loves in the Rare Book Room at the Library of Congress.

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Nineteen-year-old Avery helps her mother give birth to a baby boy who dies within ten minutes. While her female siblings care for their mother, Avery is given the task of burying the child.

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“a journey into the heart and longing of a spirited woman discovering her identity outside societal expectations, her search for personal freedom, her courageousness, and her empathy.”

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Nothing is more heartbreaking and disturbing than war.

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“leaves the reader with a profound sense of satisfaction.”

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