Women’s Fiction

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Martha's Vineyard is the setting for this intriguing thriller. Glass blower Kat Weber just sold one of her creations, receiving a fortune for it.

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In a world in which books, TV, and the media often seem to be screaming, it’s refreshing to come across a novel that remembers the value of the whisper, of subtlety, and of not having to have every

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Shadow Child is a detective story set in 1960s Manhattan, and also a historical saga of a Japanese-American woman during World War II, and also a tale of teen rivalry, which shifts from pa

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For roughly three years, between ages 37 and 40, the unnamed narrator of Motherhood—a Canadian writer living with her long-term boyfriend, Miles, a criminal defense lawyer—debates whether

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At first glance, the timing of New York Review Books Classics’ rerelease of Helen Weinzweig’s Basic Black with Pearls is almost as intriguing as the novel itself.

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“This book will be a welcome addition to modern-day discussions of women’s rights, multiculturalism, and online technologies.”

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Although slender in scope, Eventide by Therese Bohman scales one woman’s life experience in three dimensions.

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Greer Kadetsky, the brilliant, introverted child of two totally apathetic parents has never quite been able to find her voice—or, if she has found it, hasn’t been able to use it.

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Sigrid is in a tough place.

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Alternate Side by Anna Quindlen is a novel in miniature.

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This intense character-exploration story draws you along wondering, What the heck happened to Kit to make her so closed to human relationships?

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As one of 2018’s most anticipated books, Kristin Hannah’s The Great Alone had an enormous amount of buzz and early praise to live up to.

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The United States has passed the Personhood Amendment, giving fertilized human eggs full legal rights as citizens. As a result, abortion is banned.

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“Anyone who enjoys literary or psychological fiction won’t be able to put this whip smart novel down.”

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Veronica Gerber Bicecci’s debut novel, second book and her first translated into English, Empty Set (Conjunto vacío), has multiple dualities—the verbal and the visual, th

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When the book jacket describes this book as “fiendishly clever,” “with masterful twists,” which “gallops along at breakneck speed with an ending that takes your breath away,” it is enjoyable to fin

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Many women's biggest desire is to have children, and Sara Cabot is not exempt.

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“Fans of historical fiction or tales of women defying the odds will be immediately drawn in to Runyan’s crisp, effortless prose.”

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When Autumn was published 15 months ago—the first in a planned “seasonal” quartet by the award-winning, Scottish-born writer Ali Smith—it was dubbed “the first great Brexit novel.” So what

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Many teenagers deal with bullying and count the days until they can put high school behind them.

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“Cantrell weaves moving and inspirational stories that make her one of today’s most beloved storytellers. Perennials may be her most breathtaking yet.”

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“This is a gentle novel, the literary equivalent of warm slippers and a cup of tea by the fire.”

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“. . . love, I suppose, is the single prerequisite for feeling at home.”

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Short story collections often give readers a taste of a writer’s style, preoccupations, and a sense of whether the reader will enjoy an author’s longer works of fiction.

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They say you can never go home again, and after being away for a long period of time, it can be frightening to go back. This is what Teddi Lerner is facing.

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