Women’s Fiction

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Jessie van Eerden has created a surprising protagonist and a moving story full of unexpected moments that never stretch into the bizarre or unrealistic.

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Leonora in the Morning Light is less a story about love, and more a story about finding your own authentic voice.

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In Marisa Silver’s book, The Mysteries, she tackles the conundrum of relationships—of family, of friends, of children, of adults. And therein lies the mystery of the title.

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Family Law is a compelling legal thriller told with a fresh take on Southern fiction.”

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This book is a good example of how packaging and promotion can hit or miss with an audience.

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The question of literature composed in a second language is a vexed and interesting one.

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Thirty-five-year-old Amelia Paxton working at Clematis, a Southern magazine, is accomplishing her life's goals.

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Maybe you thought it was impossible. That it didn’t exist. You would never find a contemporary short story collection that was more than well written.

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Since their father deserted them seven years ago, Sophie Lawson has given her life to her family—especially to her siblings, twin brother Seth, and younger sister  Jenna—and their mother ill with m

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Autumn Divac has been living in limbo for more than 18 months. Her husband Nick, who allegedly worked with the Security Service in the Ukraine, never returned from his assignment.

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“Flynn Berry landed major awards for her two earlier thrillers, and Northern Spy merits more of the same.”

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As an only child, Caroline Porter always wanted a sibling—specifically a sister, but that didn’t happen.

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Surviving Savannah is an epic novel that explores the metal of human spirit in crisis.

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Lovely, lyrical, and often profound, The Sweet Taste of Muscadines is women’s fiction at its finest and then something more. . . .

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“Gaps of time notwithstanding, Charlier puts forth an interesting take on an historical event.”

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An undercurrent of tension wafts off the pages of this book from the start. It's subtle, but it's there. Readers know right away something is going to happen. Something bad.

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“Dalton has created a page-turning thriller with undertones of contemporaneous, serious, societal, and academic issues.” 

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“Original, informative, suspenseful—the big three in a literary slam bang.”

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Let’s face it, a book centered around the wretched child abuse of a large family at the hands of a demented religious fanatic has some inherent drama to it.

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I’m Staying Here is a simple title surrounding a profoundly moving story about ordinary people trying to live their lives as farmers, as they have for centuries. It’s 1923.

Burnt Sugar explores security and permanence, the lengths to which people go in search of what they were denied as children.”

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Marvelous and painful, truthful and penetrating, this novel, with every page, requires the reader to sense, to live in and cherish the present moment.

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It’s 2008, Barack Obama has been elected president. Ruth Tuttle and her husband Xavier are excited about what lies ahead for them.

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“a love story, and also as a glimpse of a small Cornish town during a tumultuous time in history, when a dramatic turn of events can change an isolated teenager into a daring young woman.”

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