Women’s Fiction

Reviewed by: 

“A very different, very deceptive but very entertaining Gothic tale.”

Reviewed by: 

World War I France is the setting for Miss Morgan’s Book Brigade, a work of historical fiction written by Janet Skeslien Charles.

Reviewed by: 

In a way, Xochitl González’s Anita de Monte Laughs Last is almost two novels in one, both great.

Reviewed by: 

"an enthralling and believable story."

Reviewed by: 

“a page-turning exploration of love, motherhood, and secrecy.”

Reviewed by: 

“In Mania, Shriver is not enlightening us with sharp satire; she is hitting us over the head with a baseball bat.”

Reviewed by: 

“an intensely lyrical, philosophical novella by a gifted writer, easily capable of these sophisticated leaps and drops.”

Reviewed by: 

Honey is a bittersweet concoction of loveliness, regret, hope, growing old, second chances, mortality, loneliness, inescapable familial bonds, long-nurtured grudges, and final rec

Reviewed by: 

“I liked my husband well enough . . . but I like him even better dead,” says Duchess Valencia Dedham.

Reviewed by: 

Based on the saga of the Jews emerging from the Holocaust and their determination to inhabit a land to call their own, The Boy with the Star Tattoo by Talia Carner is an epic retelling of

Reviewed by: 

“Well-written with glorious descriptions, The Tree Doctor is a highly recommended tour de force.”

Reviewed by: 

“offers readers the complicated, rich dimensions of life in and outside of Iran and the wide diversity of people daring to fight for freedom . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“portrays a woman of great intellect, beauty, and ability to read others, whose desire for power forms not for her own glory but to challenge a system that threatens her son’s life.”

Reviewed by: 

Based on a true story, The Woman with No Name follows the trajectory of the woman who is recruited as Britain's first female sabotage agent during the German occupation of France in World

Reviewed by: 

“Frances Perkins was an important role model and social welfare advocate who deserves to be better known.”

Reviewed by: 

Meagan Church begins her historical novel about the Baby Scoop of the sixties in the summer of ’64 with a drowning.

Reviewed by: 

“As a debut novel, Piglet is ambitious, sitting somewhere in the middle of the Venn diagram where comic women’s fiction, literary fiction, and absurdism meet.”

Reviewed by: 

“If you want plot, read James Patterson. If you want to think, this is the book for you.”

Reviewed by: 

Jenny Quinn and her husband Bernard have settled into retirement in the peaceful small English village of Kittlesham, where Jenny immerses herself in her love of baking and the comfort of old famil

Reviewed by: 

If the reader is looking for a cozy murder with a single plot throughout, Debbie Macomber’s 44 Cranberry Point is not the answer.

Reviewed by: 

For the history lesson alone, Cold Victory is memorable.”

Reviewed by: 

“weaves all these stories and characters into a tapestry of believability that is well-crafted, suspenseful, and satisfying.”

Reviewed by: 

It is a cold February night in 1942. Dancers are swaying to the music at London’s Feldman’s Swing Club.

Reviewed by: 

A new Jesmyn Ward novel is a literary event. Ward has won the National Book Award twice with works that encapsulate the U.S.’s horrific history of racism and inequality.

Reviewed by: 

“Quite simply it is dazzling.”

Pages