Women’s Fiction

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“this debut is a page-turner that will keep the reader . . . glued . . .”

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The Mitford Affair, an historical novel, begins in July 1932 and follows the aristocratic Mitford family through April 1941, as Britain recovers from World War I and reluctantly plunges in

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“a rich tapestry of a book . . .”

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“Alpsten does an excellent job providing vivid characterization and detail. As a result, Tsarina’s Daughter is an engaging novel that blends fact and fiction . . .”

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Winter finds us back in Marshbury, MA, as Noreen Kelly meets up with her buddies, Tess and Rosie, for their usual pre-dawn hikes.

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“Powerful characters with unforeseen events make this novel a page-turner.

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“The era, the landscape, and the people are etched in fine and imaginative detail.

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“does a good job of evoking the post-Civil War era . . .”

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With her provocative, yet tasteful and gripping writing, in Such a Pretty Girl, T. Greenwood tackles the tragic impact on lives of sexual predation in the movie and modeling industries.

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“A beautiful, compelling portrait of dance . . sure to become a book group favorite, rich in discussion topics that are as provocative as they are complex.”

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“an important reminder of something that’s easily taken for granted: the right to participate directly in one’s own government.”

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“What saves this book, in addition to the passages of Ash’s powerful voice, are the characters. They are all original, fully imagined human beings, likable in different ways.”

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Some of it Was Real is a beautiful, well-written, and well-structured novel that is easily worthy of five stars.”

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Eight-year-old Lance and his six-year-old sister Lily are visiting their grandmother, who treasures their company.

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“Lauren Denton unfurls a mystery by reconciling a buried past with a modern-day story set in a town with vibrant characters brimming with Southern charm.”

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“Pure pleasure from first page to last. . . . All the joys of writing are richly displayed here, as is all their power to evoke and hold close.”

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Starting over is difficult, but sometimes it is necessary. Olivia McFee learns this the hard way.

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Wry, sly, and nicely dry, Kate Atkinson’s 13th outing is stuffed with runaway waifs, toffs, female pickpockets, “merry maid” hostesses, bent coppers, murdered girls, a melancholy detective, an intr

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Debut author Bobby Finger wields crisp, bright language in succinct, ample prose to reveal secrets deliberately hidden from the norms of social order. . . .

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“incandescent”

The narrator of Yiyun Li’s newest book is Agnes, but she insists the story she tells isn’t really about her, but about her best friend Fabienne:

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“Cruz has created an unforgettable character in Cara. And readers will feel like they’ve made a new, fascinating friend.”

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“the thoughtful writing and masterful portraits of flawed people and their struggle for survival in a dystopian world is elegant and rewarding.”

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“Brilliantly conceived. . . . There are court intrigues, whispered rumors, a clever subplot about the power of painting, what it reveals as well as what it hides . . .

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“an intellectually engaging and psychologically probing novel about a family returning from a dark place to a better one.”

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To understand and appreciate this novel, you need to move past any aversion you might have to the idea of female killers. Women as paid assassins, murderers for hire . . .

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