Women’s Fiction

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Maria Adelman’s How to Be Eaten has a fabulous premise—in modern day New York, five women gather for a trauma support group, each of them a modern reimagining of a fairy tale heroine.

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Holding Her Breath is a generational story written in descriptive language with steady pacing. . . .

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“The book highlights the bravery, courage, and determination of a female doctor ahead of her time, saving broken bones as well as broken souls. Every woman's heroine.

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“an electrifying novel . . .”

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“The writing is vivid in the descriptions of village life in Oman . . .”

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Lizzie and Dan Fulton are barristers in the United Kingdom. While Dan, a defense attorney, handles a job Lizzie could never imagine doing, she deals with custody issues.

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This highly emotional novel includes two narratives combined in one, commencing in June 1940 in Riga, Latvia.

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Phoebe Adams is a reporter for the Weekly Sentinel, a small New England newspaper that is petering out, and she is trying desperately to save it.

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The Good Left Undone is a poignant expose on the value of the unsung heroes in a multigenerational, working-class family, and through the power of story, author Adriana Trigiani r

The Fashion Orphans is highly recommended for readers who enjoy stories about family ties and the unexpected behavior of relatives and friends, w

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Middle-aged Stephen Aston, a prominent heart physician, hires Heather Wisher, a young interior designer, to decorate his home, hoping to make his wife Pam happy.

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Engaging, suspenseful, courageous, and brimming with a warm heart, Take My Hand will stay with you long after the last page.”

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“Weaving myth and legend with historical fact pertaining to an age-old American mystery, The Lost Book of Eleanor Dare is a spellbinding, beautiful story written by a graceful hand

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Divorce attorney Marlow Madsen is fed up by the hostile couples wanting to part.

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Sometimes life can seem like a soap opera, and sometimes fact is stranger than fiction. Such is the case with the McNichol family.

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“a page-turner . . . the two stories intertwine ingeniously.”

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The world in which Geoffrey Chaucer created his considerable body of writing often painted women as the gateway of the devil, insatiable sexual monsters who consumed their men with their crude, las

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How Strange a Season contains six short stories and a novella plus a seventh short story that follows the novella and could have been included in it.

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“Readers may . . . close the book believing that with a little magic, a family may be able to survive all the hardships to create their own little happy ever after.

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It must be heartbreaking to lose your husband and the child you're carrying. Amelia Baumann is still dealing with the trauma of her loss. Though some time has passed, her wounds are not healed.

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One Italian Summer tells a story of grand proportions in which love transcends all things.

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“The Narrowboat Summer is a story about a journey through the twisting, turning canals of England as well as a journey through the twisting, turning phases of life

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The Summer Getaway is a reflective and moving tale of family ties.”

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“a riveting tale of suspenseful mystery, with a dash of romance, tossed together with a strong desire to create a loving family where there has never been one.”

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Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libr

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