Women’s Fiction

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“Gaps of time notwithstanding, Charlier puts forth an interesting take on an historical event.”

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An undercurrent of tension wafts off the pages of this book from the start. It's subtle, but it's there. Readers know right away something is going to happen. Something bad.

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“Dalton has created a page-turning thriller with undertones of contemporaneous, serious, societal, and academic issues.” 

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“Original, informative, suspenseful—the big three in a literary slam bang.”

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Let’s face it, a book centered around the wretched child abuse of a large family at the hands of a demented religious fanatic has some inherent drama to it.

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I’m Staying Here is a simple title surrounding a profoundly moving story about ordinary people trying to live their lives as farmers, as they have for centuries. It’s 1923.

Burnt Sugar explores security and permanence, the lengths to which people go in search of what they were denied as children.”

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Marvelous and painful, truthful and penetrating, this novel, with every page, requires the reader to sense, to live in and cherish the present moment.

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It’s 2008, Barack Obama has been elected president. Ruth Tuttle and her husband Xavier are excited about what lies ahead for them.

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“a love story, and also as a glimpse of a small Cornish town during a tumultuous time in history, when a dramatic turn of events can change an isolated teenager into a daring young woman.”

White Ivy is a suspenseful novel with a protagonist who is intentionally portrayed as an anti-heroine.

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“Macallister’s writing is powerful, and she concocts a gripping story with strong, very human characterizations . . .”

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It’s 2016, Mumbai.

“I cannot stop this moving train,” says Sharifa who has returned to the country of her childhood, India, with her husband and their seven-year-old daughter, Zee.

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This book by Nick Hornby is so “woke,” it’s as though the author is writing an opinion piece more than a novel.

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“Thanks to its fascinating premise and to the strength of chapters told from her point of view, the book succeeds by constantly keeping the main character off balance as the moments from th

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Growing up can be difficult, but having a strong faith, a loving family, and a good sense of direction as to where your future will lead you make things easier. And being in love also helps.

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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“a chilling story of identity and what happens when a person’s self-reality is voluntarily submerged with another’s.”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“What distinguishes Goodnight Beautiful is Molloy’s spectacular feat of misdirection and uncanny success in unfolding revelations that are surprising yet believable from the early

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“This delightful Christmas story can be enjoyed any time of the year.”

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Daughters of the Wild has an intriguing, deeply marketable premise: oppressed and repressed girls, isolated from the outside world, “tending a mysterious plant called the Vine of Heaven” i

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“. . . supremely skilled writing even though the plot goes missing in action early on.”

This is an odd duck of a book, no question about it.

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How many who have been forced to deal with a life crisis can start over—and in a tropical setting, no less? Irene Steele’s life is turned upside down after learning  

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What would you do if you were in a plane crash, but managed to survive? Being so close to death, it's only logical anyone would reassess their life.

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