Women’s Fiction

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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“a chilling story of identity and what happens when a person’s self-reality is voluntarily submerged with another’s.”

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“This delightful Christmas story can be enjoyed any time of the year.”

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“What distinguishes Goodnight Beautiful is Molloy’s spectacular feat of misdirection and uncanny success in unfolding revelations that are surprising yet believable from the early

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Daughters of the Wild has an intriguing, deeply marketable premise: oppressed and repressed girls, isolated from the outside world, “tending a mysterious plant called the Vine of Heaven” i

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“. . . supremely skilled writing even though the plot goes missing in action early on.”

This is an odd duck of a book, no question about it.

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How many who have been forced to deal with a life crisis can start over—and in a tropical setting, no less? Irene Steele’s life is turned upside down after learning  

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What would you do if you were in a plane crash, but managed to survive? Being so close to death, it's only logical anyone would reassess their life.

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“Suspense the way it's meant to be, bit by bit, drop by drop.”

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“deeply evocative, eminently readable . . .”

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The Paris Children is a page-turning and inspiring story of how courage and family ties can survive even the worst of evil.”

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Skill and craftsmanship ooze from this beautiful novel. It would be a cliché to just say that it’s well written because that wouldn’t do the book full justice.

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“You’ll open this novel because of history, read on because of story, and close it knowing more about your own life, right here, right now.”

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“A steady undercurrent of tension runs through The Frightened Ones as Suleima’s relationship with her inner world and the one around her are constantly on the point of fracturing.”

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“Powerful and compelling, the prose gets to the heart of parenting as well as self-doubt, anxiety, and heartbreak—a read many parents, especially those who have endured difficult deliveries

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“Kosa blends secrets, lies, revenge, and deceit into a complex stunner of a book.”

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What’s new and especially refreshing about Diane Cook’s new novel, The New Wilderness, are the finely drawn women characters, especially Bea and Agnes, refugees from “The City,” who are ca

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A new entrant in the unlikely but burgeoning genre of Holocaust romance fiction . . .”

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The Friendship List is a sassy, sensuous tale about two women who discover their femininity for the first time.

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“In this case, fiction gives a much truer representation of humans behind the news than the supposedly factual media do.”

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The literary rumor mill portrays Naoise Dolan as the new Sally Rooney, and that suggestion alone might push a writer onto the bestseller list these days.

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Willa and Harper Lakey are as close as two sisters could be, even considering their dissimilar personalities.

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This is an unexpected novel, full of philosophical questions about how we become who we are, what it takes to become someone else, and how much power others hold

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Jane, the so-called “Pizza Girl” of this debut novel by Jean Kyoung Frazier, lives in her own head. She works at a takeout pizza joint, delivering pizzas to a regular crew of characters.

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