Nonfiction

Reviewed by: 

The Splendid and the Vile is a tale of courage, perseverance, sacrifice, fear, tragedy, human drama, and ultimately inspiration for free peoples everywhere.

Reviewed by: 

“Preston provides a highly readable, highly detailed account of the historic meetings and often difficult and contentious negotiations between Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and their staffs

Reviewed by: 

Emily Dickinson has been called the greatest poet in the English language. She is also “America’s most enigmatic and mysterious poet.” But she is not mysterious, according to Martha Ackman.

Reviewed by: 

Sam Wasson’s biography of Bob Fosse was an engrossing portrait of a complex artist and man. It was also a fabulous read, so fast-paced that it felt like having a three-week affair with Fosse.

Reviewed by: 

“would make a lovely gift for a friend who is interested in learning more about personal change, who is exploring recovery from physical or mental illness, or who enjoyed and wants to learn

Reviewed by: 

“With the ever-increasing numbers of poor adults and children in the United States, and current government efforts to further decrease benefits for them, this is an extremely timely book.”

Reviewed by: 

“what makes this book interesting is that the author has effectively generalized the purpose and behavior of a number of liars throughout the centuries.”

Reviewed by: 

Renaissance thinking was not just about making men smarter, more intellectual, and open minded (although who would complain about that happening!).

Reviewed by: 

an incredible tale of technology and heroism.”

Reviewed by: 

“It takes a strong stomach to read this memoir, but the journey is worth it.”

Reviewed by: 

“Barnes is a delightful raconteur, and there’s a good deal of first-person rumination here throughout.

Reviewed by: 

Antisemitism Here and Now is for readers who are concerned by the dangerous rise in contemporary antisemitism but unsure how to understand and confront it.”

Reviewed by: 

Michael Klare’s newest book departs from many of his previous works on America’s oil wars and disastrous, often provocative militaristic policies.

Reviewed by: 

lucid and very depressing assessment of the current state of what some Canadians term, the Excited States of America.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“If Battle Dress is any indication of what’s to come next from Skolfield, readers should expect yet another masterfully rhythmic, morally gut-punching, timeless book of poetry.”

Reviewed by: 

“This volume fills a critical gap in the study of the American Civil War, narrating that it truly was a continental war with potential repercussions far beyond the Washington-Richmond corri

Reviewed by: 

These days many historians would ask: Why another book about a well-known founding father, in this case a dual biography of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington?

Reviewed by: 

“a marvelous and thoughtful book, refuting many of the common myths about pre-Revolution colonial politics . . .”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“For those looking for an easy introduction to the idea that women can make art, this book is a solid offering. For those wanting more, the search is still on.”

Reviewed by: 

“a more nuanced and comprehensive look at this brilliant but tortured genius . . .”

Reviewed by: 

The Last Negroes at Harvard is an accomplished work of collective autobiography that tells a compelling story of incipient transformation in a transformative time—but in a place s

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Jonathan Horn in his new book Washington’s End provides a captivating and enlightening look at Washington’s post-presidential life and the politically divided country that was par

Reviewed by: 

“Jongmans is knowledgeable about art history and passionate about combining the issues of the past with those of the present and pulling them into our modern sphere.”

Pages