Nonfiction

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The Mosquito Bowl is not just a book about war. It is, instead, about the men who fought that war.

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Like many memoirists, R. Barbara Gitenstein’s insightful and deeply personal story germinated as she looked through her life’s rear-view mirror and at the lessons she learned along the way.

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“There isn’t a marriage or romantic partnership out there that won’t benefit from this book.”

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“The scholarship here is astounding, and the reader leaves the book not only with an abundance of dog-eared pages, but also an appreciation of both the biographer’s subject (i.e., Lehman) a

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“Hercules’ beautiful, affirming tales celebrate our humanity, while her mostly easy recipes open the door to a new palette of cooking flavors and techniques.”

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Aware of the controversy and skepticism surrounding bisexuality, the author Julia Shaw, herself bisexual, sets out to trace the lineage of this condition that she insists is not “mysterious, threat

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Unshaved: Resistance and Revolution in Women’s Body Hair Politics deals with compliance with cultural norms of body hair removal—largely on the basis of data from American women— and the e

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The spirit of the title hints at the message: A British prosecutor at Nuremberg, Sir Hartley Shawcross, encouraged the judges to imagine that all of humanity stood before them, crying out, “These a

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The Day I Die is an informative and accessible addition to the literature of death and dying.

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“Orlando Figes’ new book The Story of Russia could not be more timely or informative.”

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“Aguon is a skilled and heartfelt writer, and his book will most likely be inspiring to readers who share his political analysis and seek out the personal stories hidden by geo-political co

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“Quickly digested, bite-sized moments in pregnancy and motherhood . . .”

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To start, let us thank Nachoem Wijnberg for doing something rare in poetry. He admits openly what all poets know of themselves: that they are talentless, and their success unearned.

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Plagues and epidemics, in various forms, have been a feature of recorded human history for over 3000 years.

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“And there you have the triumvirate of personalities that captivated America at the height of the Roaring Twenties: a match made in hell of two sociopaths, one a manipulator and one a ‘mall

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“Chin and Lin show that China today is a dystopian state where the CCP has harnessed the latest surveillance technology—facial recognition software, biometric data collecti

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Music memoirs come in many different forms, but Three Pianos by Andrew McMahon is in a small sub-genre: the self-loathing confessional.

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Miranda Seymour has produced a detailed and exhaustive account of the life of novelist Jean Rhys on the basis of her short stories, novels, and an unfinished autobiography, Smile Please, w

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“With A Life of Service: The Story of Senator Tammy Duckworth, Soontornvat and Phumiruk have inspired young readers to ‘break barriers and defy expectations,’ to soar, to not waste

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Heyam has gone a long way to realizing their ambition to ‘open up space for so many more new ways to relate to gender . . .

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“The Wise Gals who started at the CIA paved the way for the many women coming after them and still provide an inspiring model.

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Trying to determine the best of anything is difficult. What are the criteria? Who is making the decisions? Who is always expected to be among the best?

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“For those looking for factual information and a new perspective on an old topic, fortunately there are other books out there.”

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The Art of Whittling: A Woodcarver’s Guide to Making Things by Hand is a strong working guide for a beginning woodworker.”

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