Law

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Lawyers learn the art of writing persuasive briefs to win cases, even when their heart does not support the facts of the case or the governing law.

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In Speak Freely, Keith Whittington, a professor of politics at Princeton University, defends free speech at colleges and universities, bemoaning that ideological activists, from both left

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Usually a work of nonfiction on the topic of a presidential commission is described as scholarly with a dash of dry.

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We are soon going to have a clash between President Donald Trump and international law.

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President Donald Trump watches a lot of television. Tweets from Mr. Trump's account indicate that his viewing habits include a healthy dose of news programming.

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Looking for a good cause for 2018? Something you can do while sitting in your armchair? Something that needs to be done if we are to live in a “clean” planet?

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Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been acknowledged as innocent victims of wrongful conviction.

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You don’t find many books like this one in our distempered times.

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In September 1983, an intellectually disabled African American teenage boy named Henry McCollum confessed to the brutal rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl.

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Blind Injustice provides great insight into how wrongful convictions happen in a system designed to avoid them.”

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When a juvenile commits a crime, the constituents of the criminal justice system must answer a question: Is the kid a criminal, or is the criminal a kid?

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Cass Sunstein’s latest, #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media, is a broad overview of the ways that social media is affecting the health and vitality of contemporary Amer

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In a recent interview, Professor Allan Lichtman—who has successfully predicted the outcome of presidential elections since 1982—said America’s founding fathers “believed that impeachment was a crit

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Geoffrey Stone’s Sex and the Constitution: Sex, Religion, and Law from America's Origins to the Twenty-First Century is one of the most importa

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“provides a broad and comprehensive framework from which anyone can gain an understanding of the powerful forces that drive the criminal justice system.”

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“Yes, I believe [Steven] Avery is innocent. This is my opinion, which I know is not worth very much, but my opinion is based on an assessment of the evidence.”
—Jerome F. Buting

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Don’t talk to police! What? Why not? Law professor James J. Duane tells you why; and if you do not heed his advice, you do so at your peril. Does that shock you?

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“If Americans understood the extent to which policing fails to supervise itself, fails to rid the system of corrupt or corrosive cops, they would likely be shocked.”

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American “exceptionalism” has once again become a political headline. Few candidates would dare to challenge the underlying truth that America is simply better than all other nations.

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“as timely as the headlines in the morning newspaper with regard to one of the knottiest issues in modern jurisprudence.”

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Every once in awhile a book comes along that challenges deep seated assumptions and beliefs, upends one’s complacency, and plants seeds of discontent in the mind of the reader.

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Diplomatic editor for The Guardian Julian Borger returns to the Balkans in this chronicle of the pursuit and capture of war criminals by the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague.

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Jeanine Pirro revels in controversy, often provokes it, and then spins it to her advantage.

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“Anyone who wishes to thoroughly understand the development of today’s geopolitical world must read Mr.

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