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“Real discussions about race are complex, and so is good art. Savage Conversations breaks apart the myth of the Lincolns as white saviors.

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“The night a stone-fisted neo-barbarian would beat her to gashes and aches everlasting.”

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Imagine waking up one day and finding you're someone entirely different, your very essence changed overnight.

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“Adina Hoffmann’s admirably condenses a lot of literary, theater, movie and socio-political history in an otherwise fascinating study of Hecht, the man, the writer, the cad, and the relucta

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"Bukowski tells us: 'Drinking is a form of suicide where you’re allowed to return to life and begin all over the next day.'”

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“a book that speaks loudly to black lesbians and to anyone who dares to love fiercely.”

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The Brits would call Bob Rosenthal an amanuensis.

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“the writing soars. Stoner redux is a dream come true for those who dream of immortality; the afterlife of the novel beggars its beginning.”

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“his poetic prose is a joy to read even when its vision is pessimistic.”

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“a conversation loaded with details, ideas, analyses, and a profound understanding of a moment in American literary history and the people who lived it.”

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Beyond the obvious reversal of a typical coming-of-age story found in the popular young adult (YA) genre, Madeleine May Kunin’s Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties is a memoir full o

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“This book of essays reaches out to Americans of varied ethnicity and backgrounds with the goal Powell’s mother set for him as a child: to overcome all obstacles to tell the unvarnished tru

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First things first: Michèle Mendelssohn’s Making Oscar Wilde is not a biography.

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“Forget your fishnet fantasies and take the rose out of your teeth,” Meghan Flaherty tells us in the prologue to her memoir Tango Lessons.

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In the fall of 1948 Ernest Hemingway and his fourth wife Mary traveled to Europe, staying in Venice for a few months.

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From start to finish, readers will experience Philip Roth’s love of language, sharpness of insight, playfulness, and power of imagination.

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"Alsen uses a conversational style for this concise narrative that enlightens a part of a dark and mysterious literary figure of our time."

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The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke is Jeffrey C. Stewart’s biography of one of the most influential scholars of the early 20th century.

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Contemporary readers probably won’t recognize the name Edward Garnett, not unless they’re students and scholars of modern British literature.

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"a comprehensive biography befitting a giant of the literature of the United States.."

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“Sooner or later, we have to venture beyond our biological family to find our logical one, the one that actually makes sense for us.

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“a tantalizing look into how Austen’s classic works were shaped by her close relationship with her brother, as well as the financial scandals and disasters of the Regency era.”

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Two hundred years after her death on July 18, 1817, Jane Austen and her novels are now more beloved than ever before.

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Although many consider that the modernist period of literature began just prior to the start of the 20th century and continued into the 1960s, and included many familiar names, it is the year 1922

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Ever since it was first published in England in 1847 and in the U.S. in 1848, Jane Eyre has been a literary phenomenon, widely read, profoundly influential, and lovingly imitated.

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