Nonfiction

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This novel is a real-time, disturbing blitzkreig. It is also an important, exhausting, and challenging book about our army during today’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Ian Bremmer ought to have an easy time proving his basic premise: “only genuine free markets can generate broad, sustainable, long-term prosperity.” Yet he fails.

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“It’s laissez-faire until you get in deep shit.” This is how Michael Lewis ends his latest book, The Big Short. This pretty much sums up his feelings and how the book unfolds.

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Memo to: Messrs. O’Reilly & Tennant

From: Your Book Reviewer

I read your book.

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(Wiley, February 2010 )

 

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How timely, that on the day I began reading this excellent book, in mid-January 2002, the weekly magazine Science News included an article whose headline was “Record Science Budget Evaded

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The more appropriate title for this book would be “A Love Letter” from the Edge of the Catwalk.

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Thank goodness not everyone can make a living off of their childhood ambitions. Otherwise, who would serve as insurance actuaries?

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It’s not unusual for scholars to come up with approximately the same idea at about the same time.

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Monologues are important items in an actor’s tool kit. Most audition situations require an actor to deliver a monologue as part of the casting process.

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This large format book is no coffee table artifact. A lively text by the Los Angeles Public Library’s map archivist, Glen Creason, along with an introduction by fellow native D. J.

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From January 1920 to December 1933, Americans were forbidden by law to manufacture, possess, or distribute alcoholic beverages.

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It is surprising that a Web search did not turn up a blog for Hugh Raffles.

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“What you read here is what dribbled out of the jelly I call my brain when I asked it for my life story. Nothing more, nothing less . .

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I want my obituary to say that
I wrote in the language of dogs
and not that I sat sprinkling
black letters on a white ladder,
leading my own eye down

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What happens when humans breathe? When we inhale, do we pull or push the breath? Neither! When humans breathe, air is pushed into the body by atmospheric weight.

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It’s tough to throw around descriptions such as “legendary,” and “arguably the very best to be found on the planet,” and live up to them with something as simple as a brownie.

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The word Evil is displayed in huge red font on the cover of Baldacci’s latest thriller. This display could not be more appropriate.

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 Wendy Richmond has put together a swirling assortment of ideas, observations, tips, philosophy, quotes, and anecdotes about art.

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Dog stories are meant to tug at the heartstrings. But A Man and His Maniac: The Bunkie Story does so in a down-to-earth way.

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Most of us know someone who could use a little basic instruction in the kitchen: a college student or recent graduate living in his/her first apartment, a newly single adult, a neighbor, a friend o

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Are geniuses born or made? Is there such a thing as natural talent? Are some people born with more talent and ability than others? For as long as most of us can recall, the premise of nature vs.

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Science depends on the ability of experiments and observations made out in the world to be repeatable by other observers.

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It is known as the “Death Zone”—the part of a mountain that punches above 26,000 feet.

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