Caitlin Hicks

Caitlin Hicks is an author, international playwright, and acclaimed performer. Her debut novel, A Theory of Expanded Love, won numerous awards: iBooks Best New Fiction, Bronze Book of the Year in Literary Fiction (Indiefab Award), Best Inspirational Fiction (Next Generation Indie Awards), Literary Fiction (Somerset Awards) Silver Medal: Inspirational Fiction (Reader’s Favorite) and JDC Top Must Read Books of 2015.

Ms. Hicks has performed on CBC national radio; one of her plays "Singing the Bones" was adapted to film and screened internationally to critical acclaim. Her monologues are featured in Smith & Kraus’ series Best Women’s Stage Monologues (New York), and She Writes (Playwrights Canada Press). Her writing has been published in The Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Vancouver Sun, and other publications.

Before becoming a playwright and performer, Ms. Hicks worked in publicity for CBS radio and was Manager, Advertising and Promotion for NBC radio in San Francisco. As Press Manager for the public art projects Paintings Below Zero, she facilitated millions of dollars of free international publicity on all media platforms. For these installations in major international cities, she created a temporary fan base of tens of thousands through project-specific blogs.

Books by Caitlin Hicks

Book Reviews by Caitlin Hicks

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The premise of this novel about a couple in their fifties, who make a pact with each other to off themselves on their 80th birthday, is a study of themes that author Lionel Shriver investigates in

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A young, Black woman in Parsons, Georgia, raised by her grandmother and living somewhat contentedly in a community of God-fearing good folk comes of age in 1936, surrounded by a world built on slav

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Elizabeth Letts, New York Times bestselling author of The Perfect Horse, has written an adventure inspired by a real person who faces the predicted end of her life with bold audac

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I’m Staying Here is a simple title surrounding a profoundly moving story about ordinary people trying to live their lives as farmers, as they have for centuries. It’s 1923.

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Marvelous and painful, truthful and penetrating, this novel, with every page, requires the reader to sense, to live in and cherish the present moment.

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“The world that Mytting brings the reader into is a lost world of simplicity and harshness and a stunning beauty where almost everything is within plain sight, and yet almost nothing can be

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It seems a shame when a story begins with the death of the protagonist, but it signals the book’s trajectory and creates a story that must be told, now, lest it be forgotten.

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It’s 2016, Mumbai.

“I cannot stop this moving train,” says Sharifa who has returned to the country of her childhood, India, with her husband and their seven-year-old daughter, Zee.

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You like this character, she’s under your skin; you want to go on this journey with her. And then she says, “I’ve decided to die.” It’s only page 27.

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“Why struggle to open a door between us when the whole wall is an illusion?”

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1986. Fulgencio Ramirez, a pharmacist in a border town called La Frontera, reads the obit section every morning, waiting for a man to die so he can move in and scoop up his wife.

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“although McNally’s stories seem unbelievable at first, they throb with a recognizable human heartbeat, powered by love and regret and the mystery of life.”

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Behind the Red Door by Megan Collins is a chilling psychological drama as disturbing as it is mysterious.”

 

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Winner of the 2020 International Book Award for LGBTQ Fiction, Carousel is the debut novel of April Ford and the story of a middle-aged woman caught between the buried emotional impact of

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The Book of Longings is well named, well inspired, and well imagined—a superlative effort from a writer at the top of her game.”

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"Because it’s so topical and #MeToo and yet not #MeToo at all, because it’s written with so many nuanced and believable details, My Dark Vanessa is gripping from the first

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“A clever story with a well-written and worked out plot, a window into the world of neuroscience and a meditation on consciousness and identity, Mr.

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The Majesties, although it rolls out easily, troubles deeply, haunting and even chilling its reader well beyond the final page.”

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The opening chapter of Fishnet, the debut novel by Kirsten Innes, is a mystery that takes almost the entire novel to piece together. Who is speaking? What is happening?

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Readers of literature, especially those trained in the classics, come to every book and novel with not-so-deeply-buried expectations that the book they’re about to open, the story they’re about to

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The Third Daughter is a tribute to the women who endured, who killed themselves, who were brutalized, who escaped, who lived the horrors described therein.

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“Sympathy for Celia and a curiosity about children trapped in bunkers with psychopaths keeps the heart of this novel beating . . .”

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In her latest novel, New York Times bestselling author Alison McGhee tackles a moral conundrum that promises to push all the buttons around freedom of choice.

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“Twists and turns abound in this suspenseful story, like the layers of an onion, peeled away one by one as the story progresses.”

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Another Wall Street story of youthful ambition, innocence seduced and corrupted by vast wealth, evil scammers and the promise of happily ever after.

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In The Dream Daughter, time travel, the Vietnam War, North Carolina, and the modern digital world are all backdrop for a mother’s connection with and devotion to her unborn child.

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The Naked Truth, a memoir by Leslie Morgan, bestselling author of Crazy Love and Mommy Wars, is proof of an experienced writer.

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“For anyone who’s ever wanted to conquer the Big Apple, this novel allows a vicarious experience while witnessing close up the early saga of the force that Cosmopolitan became for

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The first page of When All Is Said is an advertisement from a Thomas Dollard for an “Edward VIII Gold Sovereign Coin, 1936. Willing to pay top price.”

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“A lovely book, a worthy debut novel, a satisfying read.”

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" It’s fascinating to look back at life centuries ago, to imagine the people and their circumstance, and this novel fleshes them out with an assured storytelling style."

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"a worthy read about this gorgeous and talented woman."

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The Glass Ocean, an ambitious project written by three New York Times bestselling authors is a work of historical fiction mixed with a huge mystery at its core and a couple of rom

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Miss Kopp Just Won’t Quit presents a feisty, eccentric woman in the fall of 1916, way before women’s lib was even a term.