Biography, Autobiography & Memoir

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revisionist history at its finest, offering a compelling narrative of the neglected factors that brought about the century’s bloodiest war, convincingly making the case th

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“As impressive for empathetic portraits of individual women as its ambitious scope, The Barbizon should be an essential text on the topic of women’s studies.”

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“In 1883, English intellectual Francis Galton coined the term eugenics (meaning ‘wellborn’) to advocate a selective breeding program among humans.”

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“Hunter spares no details about any aspect of his life, so that we feel his cautious optimism when he enters yet another rehab or recovery program and crash with him when he inevitably begi

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Our country has been at war for 20 years, and despite several presidents promising to get us out of conflicts in the Middle East, each one has been defeated in his ambitions to date.

”Many will judge that, despite all the emotional chaos, William Feaver has cornered a lion, and that Lucian Freud has earned his place in the pantheon of great post-war realist painters.

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It’s not surprising that the jacket blurb compares this new memoir to Patti Smith’s Just Kids. Besides being a terrific book, that one sold really well.

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In November 1995, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking (1942–2018) sold out London’s Royal Albert Hall (capacity: 5,900) for a lecture entitled “Does God Throw Dice in Black Holes?” A physicist ha

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“‘Yes, I was odd, but not on purpose . . . Nor, I now realize, was I the only one.””

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“The Invention of Miracles paints a textured portrait of a man driven not by an entrepreneurial desire to invent a product that changed the world but by a passion

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in Philip Roth: The Biography, Blake Bailey provides ample evidence of his understanding of modern American literature and the frailties and achievements of an ar

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As with her four brilliant novels, Rachel Kushner’s The Hard Crowd, 19 essays from the last two decades, takes the reader on a wild ride.

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“an engrossing portrait of the artist, his art, and his incorrigible personality.”

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Rudyard Kipling—the Anglo Indian novelist, short story writer, and bard of the British Empire—must have known that it wasn't true when he wrote, "East is East, and West is West, and Never the twain

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“For the reader who is intrigued by America’s romance with gangsters, Tiger Girl and the Candy Kid is definitely worth spending time with a couple who, for just a short time, lived

Early on in The Truth at the Heart of the Lie, former Catholic priest James Carroll announces three themes or stories he will tell.

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If you have read only smaller portions of Dostoevsky, Christofi’s account will send you off to look for more.

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The Empathy Diaries should be required reading for men who care about the emotional landscape of women and the health of their own feminine side.”

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“We Are Bellingcat reveals the power within each one of us to pierce the walls of disinformation and learn the truth about what’s happening out there.”

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Secrets are at the center of Derek DelGaudio’s memoir A Moral Man. There are the secrets he chooses to keep and the ones he decides to reveal.

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Inette Miller has the distance and detachment of a journalist trained to see the big picture—and the heart of a woman who understands what it is like to be “the other.” It is these differing perspe

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“I would like to be remembered as someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability.” —Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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“Gerhardt is fluent in Lincoln history and political philosophy, but he stays close to his aspiration for the book—not to cover every event, but to demonstrate how an untutored, Western, sm

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