Nonfiction

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One of the ongoing mysteries of physics is why stuff weighs what it does.

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At almost 4 ½ pounds, the heft of Sarabeth’s Bakery suggests serious satisfaction for the sweet tooth.

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He modestly calls himself “both a physician and a storyteller.” Renowned neurologist and psychiatrist Dr.

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The Envoy is Alex Kershaw’s testimonial to Raul Wallenberg and his campaign to save the Jews of Hungary from extermination by Nazi Germany in 1944.

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If you are one of the people who have not yet read SuperFreakonomics (the original, unillustrated version), this is your chance to pick up an even more entertaining version of the original

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Mr. Gerval is moderately more successful in this volume than he was with Fashion: Concept to Catwalk due to the fact that, quite simply, this book is not about clothing per se.

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This is the first of Lorraine Heath’s latest series, featuring three brothers dubbed “the greatest lovers in England.” In Passions of a Wicked Earl, she certainly makes her case for Morgan

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Described as “an insider’s guide to the fascinating and fast moving world of the fashion trade,” this scholarly endeavor reads far more like a textbook or how-to manual rather than any sort of guid

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If “one-pot dishes” makes you think just of soups and stews, One-Pot Dishes for Every Season aims to widen your horizons.

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Some say the book is dead.

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“I was born into the century in which novels lost their stories . . .”

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Webster’s dictionary defines the word icon as an object of uncritical devotion.

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These verses come from the earliest surviving Buddhist texts.

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Obama’s Wars is the first real, living history of the Obama Administration as told by many White House insiders: including the President himself.

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Once upon a time, in the Old Country known as Italy, the Pattis from Sicily and the LuPones from Abruzzo both moved, quite separately, to the United States of America and to the Empire State of New

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Bill Bryson provides the introduction to this wonderful book written for the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society, founded in 1660 in London.

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For an introduction to Italian wine, Vino Italiano: The Regional Wines of Italy, by Joseph Bastianich and David Lynch, is a good choice.

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Critics have been lamenting the decline of French cooking for years.

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This is a very interesting book, albeit with a misleading title. Perhaps the title was a ploy to attract readers of popular science, when in fact this is a book for readers of serious science.

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We can carve journalism into two distinct cuts: the tough, chewy chuck of reporting and recording events and facts, and the sirloin of narrative.

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Here’s a book that is sure to show up on nearly every foodie’s holiday wish list this season.

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Mistletoe, long evenings beside warm fires, even the inevitable eggnog-related indiscretion: It’s no wonder that romance jumps on the holiday bandwagon like no other genre.

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Coverage of women’s contributions to the struggle for Irish independence early last century harps on two names: Maud Gonne and the Countess Constance de Markievicz.

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Of Marilyn Monroe, Karen Blixen, who achieved fame under the pen name of Isak Dinesen, wrote, “I think Marilyn is bound to make an almost overwhelming impression on the people who meet her for the

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When a notorious Italian assassin and his wife are found stuffed in a barrel and floating down the Thames River, Scotland Yard puts out a call to Inquiry Agent Cyrus Barker to assist them in foilin

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