Charlene Brusso

Charlene Brusso has worked as a physicist and scientific programmer, as well as a janitor, a baker, a writing teacher, and a museum curator’s assistant. Her articles, reviews, and interviews have appeared at Space.com, Publisher’s Weekly, ASK, Odyssey, Science World magazine, and NY Journal of Books, among others. Her fiction has been published in Fantasy magazine and Amazing Stories, to name just a few.

Currently Ms. Brusso juggles writing with a part-time job on the circ desk at the local library, along with wrangling a very active nine-year-old son.

Book Reviews by Charlene Brusso

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Esther Friesner vividly reimagines the early life of Queen Himiko, fabled leader and sorceress of the Yayoi people of third century Japan in this latest story from her exciting and unique Princesse

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“Royal Street is paranormal fantasy for readers who like to savor wry humor and vivid characters as much as dark magic.”

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“Fans of quick-paced, lighthearted cozy mysteries will cheer for Lucky’s sarcastic wit and the glittering thrill of her oddball world where crazy is just an everyday fact of life.”

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“While the story begins with promise, Eyes in the Mirror fails to live up to expectations.”

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“Long for This World is a grand survey of cutting-edge biology in the hands of visionary researchers, made vivid by Mr. Weiner’s marvelous writing.”

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“Ms. Eilperin regales us with the facts with all the smoothness of a skilled storyteller. . . .

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Cynical sword jockey-for-hire Eddie LaCrosse returns in a new medieval murder mystery drawn straight from the mists of legend in Alex Bledsoe’s entertaining third novel in the LaCrosse series (foll

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Cocky, streetwise Lucky O’Toole returns (following last year’s much-praised Wanna Get Lucky?) for another off-the-wall adventure in Las Vegas, where off-the-wall is absolutely normal.

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Before television and movies, long before the Internet, there was magic.

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The exact age of our universe is one of the biggest mysteries—if not THE biggest—that we can imagine.

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Time and place make the story of Marie and Pierre Curie unique in the world of science and history.

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Language is magic. It allows us to communicate the intangible as well as the concrete; to relate history, invent story, and blend both into the sometimes maddening mix called legend.

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Marvel Creek, in East Texas in the early 1930s, might be any small town in the South—rural bottomland bordered by the muddy Sabine River.

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There are times when every teenager in the world feels like an alien. But Mackie Doyle doesn’t just feel like an outsider; he knows he is different: not normal, maybe not even human.

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“The history of the world begins in ice, and it will end in ice.” The setting of Elliot’s new fantasy series is a 19th-century England in a world trapped in a millennia-old Ice Age.

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Everyone’s favorite serial killer returns for a fifth outing through the darker side of Miami, and the theme this time is definitely family.

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As fascinating as it is, we tend to take our solar system for granted. After all, from our puny human perspective, the local astronomical real estate doesn’t change much.

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After 10 previous books of the “Otherworld” supernatural mystery series, New York Times bestselling writer Armstrong focuses on 21-year-old P.I./witch Savannah Levine.

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Lucky O’Toole has a job that some people would kill for: head of Customer Relations at the Babylon, the biggest, poshest casino/hotel in Las Vegas.

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It’s been six years since New York Times bestselling author Crusie’s last solo novel.

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Kisses can come with a lot of baggage.