Nonfiction

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How the heck did Hewlett-Packard become the Peyton Place of Silicon Valley?

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If you are not yet familiar with Molly Wizenberg through her award-winning food blog, Orangette, you are in for a treat.

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In 1997, one bad decision environmental science writer and adventurer Jon Turk made during his 25 years of backcountry skiing triggered an avalanche that nearly did to him what kayaking and sailing

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Scientific Characters chronicles the events of “Datagate,” in which a prominent breast cancer researcher and oncologist falsified patient data in a landmark clinical trial.

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With a little background from his Three Cups of Tea, Greg Mortenson continues his unbelievable saga of his quest to build schools in “the last best place.” He insists on working in areas o

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Most wine writers were likely English or history majors or the like, and many wine books talk about the romance, mystery, and poetry of wine, and sometimes describe wines in anthropomorphic terms.

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Did you know that pay for performance schemes do not work and can actually be harmful to human motivation? Or that extrinsic motivation is detrimental to creativity?

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Not every programmer may be a scientific programmer, but all programmers will at some point have to deal with correctness, efficiency, and requirements changes, and some may have to deal with float

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 (Bantam Dell, May 2009) In the nature vs. nurture argument, Daniel Coyle comes down firmly on the side of nurture, and makes a compelling case. Mr.

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Jaron Lanier, an early developer of Virtual Reality, presents his manifesto, his state-of-the-union address of the cultural impact of the Internet and the Web. He has been prescient in the past.

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In 1990 Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar wrote Barbarians at the Gate, the account of the leveraged buyout of RJR Nabisco.

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Jason Siff advises “what to do when the instructions get in the way.” That is, for both beginning and experienced meditation students, he encourages practitioners to relax.

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Cockroaches will endure after the final mushroom cloud disappears; similarly, the financial industrial complex—the economists, traders, bankers, regulators, and journalists—will continue to try to

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IIn the small town where I live, not so many years ago conservative religious groups raised a ruckus when the local school board proposed adding yoga to the district’s physical education curriculum

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Although The New Rules of Marketing and PR is an update of the 2007 first edition book of the same name, it can also be considered as a sequel to Jay Conrad Levinson’s seminal Guerilla

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 Communication has been described as being what a person hears, not what another  person says.

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Mr. Mortimer has brought to the study of the American Civil War the biography of Pryce Lewis.

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The notion of choosing is so complex that there are now two popular books on the subject. Each was written by an author who is an expert in their field of study.

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Take a quick skim through Supper for a Song, and your first thought may be, “Wow, songs sure must cost more in Britain.” This book will pull readers in with its attractive layout and photo

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This historically accurate book, a real gift to children, explains the effective and admirable life of Effa Manley, the first important female baseball clubowner.

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Small business consultants know that people talk about 90% of the time and communicate about 10%.

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In a more innocent time in New York City, before the 9/11 catastrophe, Richard Gallin cavalierly counseled his under-achieving son, “Pretend to be a thing all your life and at the end of your life,

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In Paris Under Water, history professor and director of the Environmental Studies program at Memphis’ Rhodes College, Jeffrey Jackson, reconstructs a little-known story of civic disaster f

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Sean Ferrell’s daring first novel, Numb, is a Barthian fable which endeavors to chart a course through the murky waters of sensory overload in the modern world.

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