Nonfiction

Reviewed by: 

Peggy Orenstein, noted journalist and bestselling author has spent two decades reporting on the issues of womanhood, girlhood, and female empowerment, and she makes a surprising confession on the f

Reviewed by: 

Expelled from Eden, wanderlust may have been one curse for Adam and Eve. In this survey of modern exiles, their yearning to go back to the Garden afflicts them with the same intensity.

Reviewed by: 

Alan Arkin can be called an actor’s actor. He is immersed in the craft of acting, and he has been since childhood.

Reviewed by: 

It odd when the subject of the “biography” or paean is a co-author of his own book, but it becomes even stranger when this person never speaks in the first person.

Reviewed by: 

A father hits his wife while grieving the loss of his son. Overcome with guilt, he wanders for days in the woods and nearly dies.

Reviewed by: 

“To be well loved is to be free of the evil lurking around the next darkened corner. Every child should know that feeling.”

Reviewed by: 

“This book answers the questions (of politics and religion) through two broad theses. 1.

Reviewed by: 

Following Phileas Fogg’s route, with detours thrown in for more tasty bites, food and travel writer Nan Lyons offers a tour of her favorite stops in Around the World in Eighty Meals.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Jim al-Khalili holds a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Surrey and is the chair of the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

". . .an impressive work, abounds with new information about the formation of what Americans have long thought of as their national game . . ."

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Jennifer Wright Knust, a professor of New Testament and early Christian studies at Boston University and an “American Baptist pastor,” recalls her own shaming as an adolescent for presumed sexual i

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Everyone knows by now how Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk, was driven from his native Vietnam in the late 1960s and has since become an international peace advocate (nominated of the Nobel Peace P

Reviewed by: 

For a lot of readers today, the word “memoir” has become a kind of code word for dysfunctional family history: a portrait of a victim-turned-artist who overcomes tragedy and abuse to become the sup

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Even the longest journey, the saying goes, begins with the smallest step.

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Take note of this novel as you’re sure to hear about it again over the coming months.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Author Lipstadt’s name entered the headlines when she was sued for libel by the Holocaust denying pseudo-historian David Irving.

Reviewed by: 

A short, novella-style book with no words, Images You Should Not Masturbate To uses random photographic images of common objects that, when viewed on their own merit, contain no hint of se

Reviewed by: 

When she turned seventy-nine she wrote to tell me that although she was now legally blind she had decided to study medicine: “I am thinking of going to nursing school . . .

Reviewed by: 

It all started with a conversation between a son and his mother. Mom mentioned that “Daddy” would have been 100 on his next birthday.

Reviewed by: 

Annette Gordon-Reed sets the tone for her study of Andrew Johnson, 17th president of the United States in her introductory remarks:

Reviewed by: 

Do you:
a) Think food and high-tech belong in the same sentence;
b) Own at least one smoker;
c) Travel with your whipped cream canister and multiple cartridges;

Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

If a record label could have program notes to describe its history and catalogue then this book would be it (and it has pictures for the kids![1]).

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

In Never Say Die, author Susan Jacoby recalls waiting at a New York City bus stop one frigid December day “when an old woman, who appeared to be in her eighties and was hunched over and cr

Reviewed by: 

James Gleick, James McPhee, Tracy Kidder, and Henry Petroski belong to the Pantheon of Great American Writers, the subbranch dedicated to Science, Engineering, and Invention.

Reviewed by: 

When traveling through Pennsylvania Wine Country, one encounters a number of unexceptional wines.

Pages