Nonfiction

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This large format book is no coffee table artifact. A lively text by the Los Angeles Public Library’s map archivist, Glen Creason, along with an introduction by fellow native D. J.

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From January 1920 to December 1933, Americans were forbidden by law to manufacture, possess, or distribute alcoholic beverages.

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It is surprising that a Web search did not turn up a blog for Hugh Raffles.

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“What you read here is what dribbled out of the jelly I call my brain when I asked it for my life story. Nothing more, nothing less . .

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I want my obituary to say that
I wrote in the language of dogs
and not that I sat sprinkling
black letters on a white ladder,
leading my own eye down

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What happens when humans breathe? When we inhale, do we pull or push the breath? Neither! When humans breathe, air is pushed into the body by atmospheric weight.

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It’s tough to throw around descriptions such as “legendary,” and “arguably the very best to be found on the planet,” and live up to them with something as simple as a brownie.

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The word Evil is displayed in huge red font on the cover of Baldacci’s latest thriller. This display could not be more appropriate.

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Although there are many other fields in which it matters, sports is probably the most obvious and most widely recognized area of human endeavor in which clutch performance is observed, studied, and

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In Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American Women, Rebecca Traister follows key women involved in the 2008 Presidential election, to tell the story “about the country

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When a child is comes into this world, a mother’s heart is filled with joy and unconditional love. No more is that revealed than in Ms. Humphrey’s book, A Mother’s Promise.

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Can a cook’s shelves hold too many ice cream books? Not with summer looming, and not if there’s still space for The Ciao Bella Book.

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Diana Gabaldon writes in the beginning of her first graphic novel, The Exile, that her mother taught her to read by the age of three by reading her comic books.

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There are many ways to parse the sources of success in this world.

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The words “Armenia” and “bittersweet” have been a natural pairing for the people of that country and its diaspora.

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Anderson, Kumar and Narus have written a pretty good book.

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“When I’m bored I feel very old, and since I’m extremely bored with you, I’m going to be a thousand years old in five minutes. . . .”

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If you slept through high-school chemistry, this is your chance to learn about the Periodic Table in a truly painless and highly entertaining way.

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Ophelia Field was born in Australia to American parents and now lives in London with her partner and children.

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Norman Doidge’s book, The Brain That Changes Itself, helps to usher in a new branch of brain science called neuroplasticity.

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 “All I wanted to do in this book was to sell you
on being the artist you already are.”

 

Naked honesty is becoming—a rare and beautiful fashion, suited perfectly to the mind of a writer.

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“If the man doesn’t believe as we do, we say he is a crank, and that settles it. I mean, it does nowadays, because now we can’t burn him.” —Mark Twain

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There was a time, up until the early 1980s, when someone of relatively modest means could, if interested, buy the great wines of Burgundy, the grand crus and premier crus, on a fairly regular basis

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With multinational corporations firmly ensconced as the evil raptors of our economy, small businesses have now become the red, white, and blue of a new commercial patriotism.

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