World Literature

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Moroccan writer Tahar Ben Jelloun is an award-winning internationally bestselling author who has been regularly shortlisted for the Nobel Prize, among others.

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"If reading about smoking hashish were half as interesting as doing it, this novel would be brilliant."

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Patrick Modiano goes beyond the checklist accuracies of historical fiction, fashioning a lush fever dream filled with glamor, mystery, and despair.”

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On a routine visit to Belgium to buy 20 million pounds of wheat, a Moroccan government official finds his trousers have disappeared.

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At first glance, The Angels Die is a straightforward story about a young man afflicted by crippling poverty who finds meaning in his wretched life through boxing.

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“a well-written story by an inventive writer.”

“She thought about secrets and the damage they did.”

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The biggest problem with Josefine Klougart’s One of Us Is Sleeping is that the one asleep is probably the reader.  

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A decade ago Israeli novelist A. B. Yehoshua caused a public brouhaha that highlighted a hitherto overlooked fault line in Israeli-diaspora relations.

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Michèle Audin's debut novel One Hundred Twenty-One Days is a story about mathematics and love.

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a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

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“In a suspense novel that is the literary equivalent of Hitchcock’s Psycho, Lemaitre presents a harrowing look into the link between madness and evil.”

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The 19th arrondissement in Paris is a cosmopolitan melting pot district where multicultural citizens live, love, and worship alongside one another, enjoying Kosher sushi and kebabs, and different s

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Oleg Kashin may be a recognizable name to readers who paid attention to international news.

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“Fans of the genre will not be disappointed by this latest Irene Huss novel.”

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On the evidence of A Room (Kheder in Hebrew), the second of its author’s four fiction books and the first to be translated into English, Youval Shimoni is a writer’s writer whose

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“Fans of thrillers with the hint of the supernatural will enjoy reading . . .”

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After the release of his quirky 2014 movie The Grand Budapest Hotel, director/writer Wes Anderson confessed to The Daily Telegraph in London, “I stole from Stefan Zweig,” though n

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The psychological tortures that  Roberto Arlt puts his main protagonist through are on a par with those endured by Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment or Dmitri Karamazov.

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Following in the footsteps of Isaac Beshevis Singer and Shalom Aleichem, Helen Maryles Shankman is an exquisite storyteller of early 20th century Eastern European Jewish life.

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After ten years of war, soldiers have grown weary. The leadership now endures uncouth criticism of its policy, accusations of self-interest and self-aggrandizement become commonplace.

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With Japanese ghosts and demons, author Sean Michael Wilson and illustrator Michiru Morikawa have created cultural Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark in comic form.

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Potential is unrealized in Mingmei Yip’s newest novel. The dialogue is awkwardly delivered and falls flat.

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For the average Western reader, diving into Hend Al Qassemi’s debut novel Black Book of Arabia is an eye-opener.

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The small town of Arvida, Quebec, becomes the focal point for Samuel Archibald's haunting short story collection.

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“[a] fine novel that educates and entertains.”

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