World Literature

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“In a suspense novel that is the literary equivalent of Hitchcock’s Psycho, Lemaitre presents a harrowing look into the link between madness and evil.”

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The 19th arrondissement in Paris is a cosmopolitan melting pot district where multicultural citizens live, love, and worship alongside one another, enjoying Kosher sushi and kebabs, and different s

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Oleg Kashin may be a recognizable name to readers who paid attention to international news.

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“Fans of the genre will not be disappointed by this latest Irene Huss novel.”

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On the evidence of A Room (Kheder in Hebrew), the second of its author’s four fiction books and the first to be translated into English, Youval Shimoni is a writer’s writer whose

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“Fans of thrillers with the hint of the supernatural will enjoy reading . . .”

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After the release of his quirky 2014 movie The Grand Budapest Hotel, director/writer Wes Anderson confessed to The Daily Telegraph in London, “I stole from Stefan Zweig,” though n

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The psychological tortures that  Roberto Arlt puts his main protagonist through are on a par with those endured by Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment or Dmitri Karamazov.

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Following in the footsteps of Isaac Beshevis Singer and Shalom Aleichem, Helen Maryles Shankman is an exquisite storyteller of early 20th century Eastern European Jewish life.

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After ten years of war, soldiers have grown weary. The leadership now endures uncouth criticism of its policy, accusations of self-interest and self-aggrandizement become commonplace.

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With Japanese ghosts and demons, author Sean Michael Wilson and illustrator Michiru Morikawa have created cultural Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark in comic form.

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Potential is unrealized in Mingmei Yip’s newest novel. The dialogue is awkwardly delivered and falls flat.

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For the average Western reader, diving into Hend Al Qassemi’s debut novel Black Book of Arabia is an eye-opener.

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The small town of Arvida, Quebec, becomes the focal point for Samuel Archibald's haunting short story collection.

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“[a] fine novel that educates and entertains.”

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If you are going to read this novel, make time to do so. There is no point in starting and then going off to do something else, for when you come back you will probably have to start again.

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Venice, renown the world over for its beauty and riches, becomes the setting for Gabrielle Wittkop's Murder Most Serene.

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“an effervescent book, comprised of two equally well-rounded stories . . .”

“if you really care about something in life, do whatever it takes not to lose it.”

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With age usually comes wisdom, and when waxing nostalgic, one usually sees the significance of youthful events in a new and understanding light.

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“many of the stories have the feel of being a novel in gestation.”

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a fascinating peek into the genesis of Austria's controversial literary figure.”

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Nobel Laureate Kenzaburo Oe brings the novelist career of his literary alter-ego, Kogito Choko, to a close with the publication of his new novel, the most recent in the series, Death by Water

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The new English translation of Patrick Modiano’s 2003 novel Paris Nocturne defies categorization.

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Michel Houellebecq, the enfant terrible of French letters, is no longer an enfant and Submission is far from terrible, but his latest novel is, as usual, an even

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“A meticulously crafted portrait of modern-day South Africa, Icarus is a spellbinding tour de force.”

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