World Literature

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“[a] fine novel that educates and entertains.”

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If you are going to read this novel, make time to do so. There is no point in starting and then going off to do something else, for when you come back you will probably have to start again.

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Venice, renown the world over for its beauty and riches, becomes the setting for Gabrielle Wittkop's Murder Most Serene.

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“an effervescent book, comprised of two equally well-rounded stories . . .”

“if you really care about something in life, do whatever it takes not to lose it.”

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With age usually comes wisdom, and when waxing nostalgic, one usually sees the significance of youthful events in a new and understanding light.

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“many of the stories have the feel of being a novel in gestation.”

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a fascinating peek into the genesis of Austria's controversial literary figure.”

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Nobel Laureate Kenzaburo Oe brings the novelist career of his literary alter-ego, Kogito Choko, to a close with the publication of his new novel, the most recent in the series, Death by Water

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The new English translation of Patrick Modiano’s 2003 novel Paris Nocturne defies categorization.

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Michel Houellebecq, the enfant terrible of French letters, is no longer an enfant and Submission is far from terrible, but his latest novel is, as usual, an even

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“A meticulously crafted portrait of modern-day South Africa, Icarus is a spellbinding tour de force.”

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a telling—and  pleasant—gateway into the talent of an artist well-worth knowing.”

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"Mirbeau's novel offers trenchant satire that will endure."

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charming and vivid if erratic and sometimes offal.”

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“Khadra’s didacticism ruins this book and leaves the novel bereft of his previously demonstrated literary power.”

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There are books that make us feel intensely and others that make us think deeply; one that does both is Gail Hareven’s opalescent and psychologically complex eleventh novel Lies, First Person

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“the effort of reading The Wall will enlarge our understanding [of the Holocaust and its aftermath].”

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Karate Chop displays an admirable willingness to take on difficult stories, and Dorthe Nors tells these difficult stories very well.”

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“. . . a masterful novel of levels and depths, beautifully written and stunningly realized.”

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“Mr. Vásquez weaves together memory and imagery into a seamless whole.”

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“. . . outstanding on every level . . . heaven sent.”

The Hanging Garden, Patrick White’s posthumous novel, is absolutely luminous, its publication a gift.

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“. . . a deeper issue lingers, making one question where the exact dichotomy between ‘good and evil’ begins and ends.”

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“. . . it is the language—the singing, ringing language—that makes Firefly a master work.”

When last did a novel start out with such crackling good language?

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