Biographical

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Once Upon a Wardrobe tells the story of the inspirational threads author C. S. Lewis wove together in his 1950 fantasy novel for children, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe.

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“a book that would be treasured by the collector of trivia, appreciated by the English major, and relished by anyone enjoying explanations of the dramatic twists and turns a word takes befo

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“A tour de force about failure and success, connection and isolation, about how we shape our lives by the stories we tell about them, and, ultimately, how stories redeem us.”

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“The real magician here is Toibin, who conjures up the complexity of the times and a rich cast of characters.”

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“The Personal Librarian is a good, well-paced creative nonfiction book about a real person that will snag the reader and hold his or her attention from beginning t

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“Any readers who enjoyed the mix of romance, intrigue, and medical accuracy of Call the Midwife will love The War Nurse.”

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Jonathan Lee’s fourth novel, The Great Mistake, opens in slyly reportorial fashion, queuing up both a dense biographical backstory and a baffling murder: “The last attempt on the life of A

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Critics for years have argued about whether T. S. Eliot was a closeted homosexual.

“Macallister’s writing is powerful, and she concocts a gripping story with strong, very human characterizations . . .”

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“Flip through the pages and find and remember the parts that will most challenge, inspire, delight. Find your own gems within Inside Story and treasure them.”

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Universe of Two is a love story. . . . It is an honest, compelling tale of the human cost of war and the fight that occurs when war ends and redemption begins.”

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“Throughout the story Austin attempts to make a point of women’s lives during the 19th century presumably using this tactic to make Lydia appear as an independent woman with the desire to s

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a great swashbuckler and ultimately a good read.”

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“an image of a proud man who gave in to the wishes of his people to reunite them with their families and suffered the ignominy of becoming a prisoner in his own land . . .”

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Americans have always been enraptured royal followers.

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Looking for an escape from quarantine boredom, but want to minimize your screen time?  Then Hillary Mantel’s The Mirror and the Light, the final, nearly 800-page volume of her bestselling,

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Notoriously, the small groups of European partisans who fought a guerilla war against the Nazis during World War II, hiding out in the area’s forests, generally refused to allow J

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James L. May has written a remarkable debut novel that brings to life one of the worst periods of soviet history.

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“Chillingly frank in its discussion of our planets fragile ecological system and the fight to save our basic natural resources.”

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Emma Donoghue is a magnificent writer, but Akin is not her best novel. Still, it’s a high bar.

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The opening chapter of Fishnet, the debut novel by Kirsten Innes, is a mystery that takes almost the entire novel to piece together. Who is speaking? What is happening?

The Dutch Maiden is a well-crafted gothic romantic story, with strong characters, set at a difficult time in Europe.”

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“Blurring the line between history and myth, Delayed Rays of a Star is encyclopedic in its detail and fit to bursting with invention.”

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“Weir’s presentation of Anna is interesting, intense, filled with myriad crises, and a fast read.”

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“Lyrical, sensual, raw, and heartbreaking, The Age of Light is Scharer’s own masterful portrait of a woman driven by longings, whose passions verge on demons, who thinks it might b

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