Humor

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“Oberländer’s underlying message of female bodies striving to conform to spaces too narrow to contain them is powerful . . .”

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“offers readers the complicated, rich dimensions of life in and outside of Iran and the wide diversity of people daring to fight for freedom . . .”

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“Their lives—like most—are lived in gray zones, in the margins and crusts, in the very conflict itself.”

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“a fun bit of vampire courtship with a dash of a mystery thrown in for intrigue.”

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“an easy read that provokes laughter throughout, but surprises with its serious themes and meaningful contemplations of friendship, loyalty, and bravery.”

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"biting humor . . . a sharp send-up of academic life . . ."

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“Between the careful plotting, the clever twists, and the colorful descriptions, Birder, She Wrote fills a nice slot for summer beach reading.”

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“a compelling, unique read.”

From the first paragraph, this debut novel grabs the reader with its voice as well as its dramatic plot setup:

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This collection of nine stories features florid depictions of low life, vivid details about dysfunctional relationships spent in seedy strip motels, and an unusual number of descriptions of toilets

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“With a set of clever twists, Berkeley finally lays out the issue of how best to see justice served, and the answers are both rueful and entertaining.”

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A Beginner’s Guide to Murder is a humorous romp through unfamiliar territory. Stopps manages her four central characters through distinct portraits.

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Liberation Day is inventive, provocative, difficult, interesting, and annoying.

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“readers visiting Beartown for the third time will not be upset that they get to spend a little more time with its residents.”

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“very funny . . . if you’re ready to laugh at pandemic absurdities, this is the book for you.”

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Tracy Flick Can’t Win is a deeply humanist work by a master of observation.”

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“Few books strike that balance so well, delivering laughter and smiles inside a story that feels like it matters. . . .

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“The book could be read as a warning about where we are headed as a society.”

The Patron Saint of Second Chances is a wry and inventive novel about a small-town mayor, Signor Speranza, in the cobblestoned hamlet of Prometto (Italian for "promise").

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"‘Becoming the library, as if it were swallowing her whole . . . an infinite nothing—everything, a god—no, a place—which is it? . . . a realm, a guide, a library, a god.’"

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Readers who haven’t yet discovered the savvy, comedic rom-coms of award-winning author Bethany Turner are in for a treat with her latest second-chance romance, The Do-Over.

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"I saw the two of them leave the party. I could think of no appropriate reason for them to sneak off together, but I told myself it was none of my business."

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“Ashton’s emphasis is clearly on the moral and philosophical implications of the Mickeys, however, not on first contact, cross-cultural relations, or the evils of colonialism.

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Recommended reading for those looking for a more lighthearted take on a region riven by suffering and war.

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Calla Henkel’s debut novel has a lot to please readers who want a heavy party scene, a frothy narrative that pulses with a heavy metal beat.

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Based on true events, Brent Spiner, of Star Trek: The Next Generation fame, takes a weird, often hilarious look at his early career via the lens of a fan stalking event that involves, amon

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