European

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“tightly crafted women’s fiction, with a sensitive look at love, conscience, and loyalty.”

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In January 1940, 16-year-old Lucie and her mother, Yvonne, leave Australia after their home is destroyed by a fire where Lucie's father has perished.

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“a journey into the heart and longing of a spirited woman discovering her identity outside societal expectations, her search for personal freedom, her courageousness, and her empathy.”

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Nothing is more heartbreaking and disturbing than war.

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An important, sensitive look at the triumph of the human spirit over evil, The Teacher of Warsaw is based on a true story and epitomizes the very best of poignant

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There are summer beach reads and then there are summer European beach reads.

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“a tale of love—platonic, familial, romantic—and of forgiveness and growth, along with acceptance of what life doles out.”

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Lana Kortchik tells the fictional story taken from facts about World War II and how it impacted the city of Kiev in Ukraine.

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Small Things Like These is a succinct, heart and soul story of a man coming to terms with a consciousness born of his personal narrative.

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Klara Hveberg has written a stunning debut novel about unrequited love, longing, obsession, betrayal, and more.

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“the suspenseful action and Hausman’s engaging prose make Sleepless worth the effort.”

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“Moving from staccato reportage to evocative scenes, the book works as a sort of collage of information, replicating in its stylistic choices the different lenses used to understand history

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“this novel offers the pleasures of a poetic travelogue and an homage to a place and culture . . .”

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“A character study of one woman’s humanity and sacrifice.”

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“Layered and lethal . . . The only thing better than the pleasure of this suspenseful and tightly plotted ‘Scandi noir’ investigation is knowing there’s a sequel on the way.”

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Meeting in Positano: A Novel by Goliarda Sapienza (1924–1996) is a disorienting experience for anyone who likes their fact and fiction to be distinct genres.

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“For most immigrants, the streets of America’s urban communities were paved with stones, not gold.” 

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Jacob Dinezon (1851–1919) has been a commanding figure in late 19th century Eastern European Jewish literature.

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The Children’s Train is a sympathetic, well-crafted novel filled with vacation-worthy sights and authentic experiences from an Italy that balances folk tradition with modernity.”

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a short, charmingly absurd portrait of postwar Germany.”

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“a novel that explores the nostalgia, loneliness, guilt, and conflicted patriotism of the (fictitious) last American who worked at the facility.”

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Novels of mystery and suspense and thrillers more often than not turn on event rather than on complex emotion.

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“moments of brilliance . . .”

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“The Summer of Kim Novak brings back to life that adolescent quandary of feeling like you know more than the adults around you, but being desperately afraid that y

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Among the masterful short story writers of the 18th century in Russia—Turgenev, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy—it is Anton Chekhov whose words are most known outside of the motherland because

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