Single Authors

The Partition is a wide-ranging collection of nine short stories focusing on aging, loneliness, sexual identity, the brutal competition in the movie industry (“Late in the Day” and “Les ho

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“In lyrical, often shimmering, language, Mirosevich finds meaning and memory in the lives lived  by the . . . sea . . .”

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We seldom find a book that we have hoped for like this one.

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“This is delightful old-school mystery fiction, filled with humor, suspense, and a knack for twisty surprises that Lovesey has made all his own.”

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“Hyperbole and exaggeration are the definition of camp, an air of performance also part of the package, and Walker’s characters obligingly give the impression of always being always in desp

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“At times uproariously funny, uncannily accurate, and glaringly insightful, David Butler’s Fugitive is a collective exposé on human nature delivered in entertaining snippets with s

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Medusa’s Ankles opens with a haunting and strangely gentle ghost story (‘A July Ghost’) and ends with a terse contemporary fable about our feckless destruction of the planet (‘Sea

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“‘Nothing about me adds up . . . People are that way, not adding up.’”  

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Allan Gurganus planted his flag on the literary landscape in 1989 with The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All.

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“For those familiar with Williams' work, her latest short story collection How High?—That High is more of the same: oft-perplexing, oft-illuminating.”

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“Few fiction writers have captured the trauma of India’s partition as powerfully as Saadat Hasan Manto, called ‘the undisputed master of the modern Indian short story’ by Salman Rushdie.”

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Filthy Animals is a bravura performance, an emphatic statement of literary power from a writer whose first novel was Booker shortlisted.”

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“Wang has the distinct skill of evoking time and place, many eras, many places, and putting his characters, and the reader in them.”

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“Rutherford is especially good at describing the liminal space between reality and imagination, especially in the storyteller’s mind . . .”

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What is made clear in this latest collection of stories is that Murakami is a master storyteller.”

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This collection is not easy to approach because of the different realities and forms of expression it uses—and they might have been useful had they prompted deeper reflections. But not.

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Dorthe Nors’ Wild Swims is a collection of 14 short stories written tightly and tensely, with most under a thousand words.

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The short stories in Mary-Beth Hughes’ collection The Ocean House are linked, not by the titular manse—the last of the great seafront houses in Long Branch, New Jersey, its property covete

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“Fiorito’s prose is magical, evocative, mesmerizing.”

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The Danger of Smoking in Bed underlines the darkness of evil.

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“With exceptional precision, concision, grace, wisdom, and insight Nicole Krauss creates a magnificent collection of stories that explore what the narrator effectively asks her son in the l

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Is it better to read a story collection sequentially?

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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“Using her remarkable, literary voice to investigate the psychological experiences of victims, Oates requires that we willingly suspend our disbelief and reject realism as a means to identi

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“although McNally’s stories seem unbelievable at first, they throb with a recognizable human heartbeat, powered by love and regret and the mystery of life.”

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