Debut Fiction

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“eminently readable, and its emotional effects linger beyond the last page.”

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A Play for the End of the World deserves credit for finding common humanity among three very different cultures, while telling a compelling story.”

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“eminently readable, and its emotional effects linger beyond the last page.”

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The Love Songs of W. E. B. Du Bois is a serious novel, a terrible but ultimately uplifting saga . . .”

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“For the reader who expects an exciting spy thriller, this book does not deliver. The plot is less exciting, but Starford’s premise holds water.”

“Sometimes the highway doesn’t take you all that far.”

Of Women and Salt is a beautifully written novel that turns like a kaleidoscope in the light, illuminating the blurry delineation of who is an insider and who an outsider.”

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“Sathian, who writes with great assurance and verve, wields her pen like a magnifying lens to examine the foibles of immigrants who are high achievers but somewhat insular and insecure.”

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“With such dark and treacherous secrets, the men of The Lamplighters echo the force of the seas around them.

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“an incredibly strong debut that hits a number of sweet spots—feminist literature, dystopian/speculative fiction, and young adult literature. It’s well worth your time.”

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps her House is the type of novel you finish and then return to Chapter One to begin again.

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“Grushin’s facility with language . . . is a marvel. It’s the kind of prose that demands you submerge yourself.”

What comes after “Happily ever after?”

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“The Orphan of the Salt Winds is a gothic novel both because of its sinister setting—an old, remote house filled with secrets and surrounded by danger—and a heavy

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“Leung has enormous potential as a writer, but there’s a layer of complexity that separates her writing from the seas of deep emotion.”

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“In this tender and heartfelt story, Sofia Lundberg offers a reminder that those we too easily dismiss, such as the elderly, have rich histories and lives that we can learn from.”

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While the works of Amy Tan, Gish Jen, and other popular Asian-American writers have charted the trials and tribulations of immigrants in the United States, Lucy Tan reverses field in her low-key, i

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“These stories are indeed strange, but no stranger than the political and moral universe we now inhabit, although infinitely more pleasurable and enticing.”

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“as satisfying as a plate of General Tso’s chicken after a night of drinking.”

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For those of us living in the Appalachian corridor, the American black bear is seldom an animal to pay much heed.

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“This novel contains perhaps one of the most unique characters of the mystery-thriller genre.”

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Caleb Johnson’s debut, Treeborne, is a story about a family living in Elberta, Alabama, where a parcel of land, 700 acres in total, arouses deep emotions as it’s about to be flooded over w

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"Kukafka eloquently describes the self-destruction that ensues by allowing others to define us."

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“A debut novel with an intriguing premise. . . . What is left when everything is gone? What does it mean to be alive in the universe and the grandeur of vast emptiness?”

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“An excellent debut . . .”

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"special style of storytelling . . ."

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