Dystopian

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Liberation Day is inventive, provocative, difficult, interesting, and annoying.

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“the thoughtful writing and masterful portraits of flawed people and their struggle for survival in a dystopian world is elegant and rewarding.”

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C. J. Carey’s novel, Widowland, couldn’t be more chilling—or dystopian—given the frightening political landscape confronting women in America and elsewhere.

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“As compelling as it is informative and as entertaining as it is terrifying, the novel The Able Archers is a great read and highly recommended.”

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Recommended reading for those looking for a more lighthearted take on a region riven by suffering and war.

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“a John Gilstrap thriller, crammed with violence and testing of the soul, might be the perfect work of fiction to sink into in a tough time for the real world.”

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To Paradise illustrates the power of narrative to make sense of our chaotic lives and even to endow them with beauty.

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“Stine’s writing is clear, unadorned, and honest yet electrifying, much like her characters, and the story is a pleasure to read.”

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The characters in Alison Stine's new novel, her second, have names like Trillium, Rattlesnake Master, Shanghai, Miami, and Coral, a young woman who was abandoned by her mother and who has lost her

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Dave Eggers’ 2013 dystopian satire, The Circle, imagined a Google-cum-Facebook corporation, the Circle, bullying a tech-dazzled world into embracing its own servitude.

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“The time of someone’s death doesn’t exist until Sapere Aude calculates it, forcing the waveform to collapse. ‘You do the math, and it makes the math come true.’”

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Pounce is an orange-and-black-striped tiger robot, “designed, to put it bluntly, to be huggable.” He was sold to the Reinhart family as a nanny for their eight-year-old boy, Ezra.

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“an incredibly strong debut that hits a number of sweet spots—feminist literature, dystopian/speculative fiction, and young adult literature. It’s well worth your time.”

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“packed with crucial climate-change information framed in fairly comprehensible terms. . . .

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At the start of Alison Stine’s first novel, Road Out of Winter, the protagonist, a young woman named Wylodine (known as Wil) leaves her rural home in Ohio and sets out for California.

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“Accept that you might have conventional horizons. Stop asking for life to be a poem. Why is it so difficult to speak plainly without allusions to books, films, and art?”

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What’s new and especially refreshing about Diane Cook’s new novel, The New Wilderness, are the finely drawn women characters, especially Bea and Agnes, refugees from “The City,” who are ca

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“Taking Early Riser into the summer reading stack will be surprisingly refreshing even though it arrives with both love and a shiver of foreboding.”

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Post-apocalyptic novels featuring orphaned teenage girl protagonists proliferate. They fill their own shelves in bookstores, and their adaptations feed film studios and crowd streaming services.

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Sergio De La Pava’s Lost Empress begins with all the right things, interesting plot, smart dialogue, and punning wordplay but sadly, like a child’s letting go of an untied balloon, Los

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An unfinished science fiction novel by Nobel Prize winning poet Czeslaw Milosz . . . sounds intriguing doesn’t it? Unfortunately the pitch is much stronger than the final product.

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Anger and outrage drip from the pages of this short single-paragraph novel. It is a rant against a county, its people, and family.

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From the margins of society arise a unique cast of characters who take turns narrating the tale in The Sunlight Pilgrims.

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“. . . enough horror to transform the most steadfast insect-lover into an arachnophobe.”

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Ten years have passed since Sophie Keane walked out of Jake Carter's life. Once Special Forces partners and lovers, all that is over.

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