Beth Kanell

Beth Kanell writes in northeastern Vermont, among mountain, rivers, and occasional bears and skunks and eagles. She reads, reviews, and writes mysteries, wider fiction, American history, and poetry, hikes the back roads and mountains, and digs into Vermont history to frame her “history-hinged” adventure novels: The Long Shadow, The Darkness Under the Water, The Secret Room, and Cold Midnight.

Find her essays in national magazines such as Lilith, and at Medium.com, with short items in Yankee, Grit, the New York Times, and more. Her poems scatter among regional publications and online. She shares her research and writing process at BethKanell.blogspot.com. Find connections there to her other online writing as well.

Book Reviews by Beth Kanell

Reviewed by: 

The Moscow Sleepers offers a sturdy display of espionage agencies wrestling to collaborate via real-life intrigue, with a nice dose of feminine teamwork.”

Reviewed by: 

“one of the most unusual, unlikely, and un-put-downable PI novels ever.”

Reviewed by: 

“Deftly braiding suspense, crime, and the search for trust and truth, Katchur works a modern ‘deliverance’ out of a harsh rural location, with potential that she more than justifies in her

Reviewed by: 

In the English seaside town of Brighton, there’s an active murderer again—one whose theatrical death scene creation immediately binds together the amazing (if aging) Max Mephisto, stage magician, a

Reviewed by: 

Matthew Farrell’s debut crime novel What Have You Done opens in Philadelphia, rich with the details he absorbed growing up in a police officer’s family.

Reviewed by: 

It’s 24 degrees below zero in Oslo, Norway, as police detective Lena Stigersand watches a corpse being pulled from the harbor, in contrast to the Christmas decorations around the market area.

Reviewed by: 

Matt Johnson’s Wicked Game trilogy began with Wicked Game, then Deadly Game, and now wraps up in End Game.

Reviewed by: 

What happens to a CIA agent who turns whistleblower on her own colleagues?

Reviewed by: 

Who would guess that a time-turning fantasy twist could be braided into a grim and edgy mystery, ending up with one of the most complex, suspenseful, and original page turners of the season?

Reviewed by: 

How marvelous to have Charles Todd set the tenth Bess Crawford mystery in Wales, the least written about part of the British Isles.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Whether it’s God or fate or karma or randomness, how should we respond when life skewers us with loss and cruel reshaping of dreams into walking nightmares?

Reviewed by: 

Spies, enemies, and friends with mixed motives: good thing investigator Billy Boyle has his close friends Kaz and Big Mike with him in Normandy, France, in July 1944, because that may be the only l

Reviewed by: 

Norwegian author Gunnar Staalesen just entered his seventies, and his crime novels date back to when he was 22. Still, he’s not well known in the US because of the lag in translation.

Reviewed by: 

The first chapter of Not Her Daughter is taut, intense, gripping—and by the end of its handful of pages, it’s clear the speaker, entrepreneur and CEO Sarah Walker, has taken someone else’s

Reviewed by: 

British author Sandie Jones brings out her debut crime novel The Other Woman as one of the creepiest “fall in love and step into danger” books ever.

Reviewed by: 

A debut thriller is always an adventure—has the author been secretly practicing the craft of tight, suspenseful writing, so that the plot will make sense, the pace will force the pages to turn, and

Author(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Closer to a Jeffery Deaver manhunt emotionally, than to Nordic noir, Manning’s debut crime novel is a keeper.”

Reviewed by: 

Young professor Jonah Baum teaches transcendental poetry and Gothic literature at a small Vermont college.