World Literature

“. . . you’ll get a kick out of this one.”

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The Canvas is an engaging read guardedly recommended to psychological mystery enthusiasts . . .”

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“. . . a writer to be admired and enjoyed. . . . But those searching for a compelling plotline played out by psychologically complex characters best look elsewhere.”

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“. . . recommended to Mr. Kiš’ admirers as well as to all readers of Eastern European literature in translation and of short form fiction.”

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“. . . an engaging, rewarding, and sometimes lyrical search for a lost time.”

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Stieg Larsson may have believed Sweden was infected with sinister conspiracies, but Nikanor Teratologen fears the evildoers probably live openly right next door.

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“We Are All Equally Far from Love is not a book to be picked up and put down.

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“Always Coca-Cola’s best moments illustrate the fault-line between tradition and modernity . . .

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“There are better Roberto Bolaño novels already out there, but The Third Reich stands up well and gives us an intriguing insight into how their author’s world view was informed by

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“Péter Nadás may infuriate readers accustomed to a Tolstoyan resolution of a series of interrelated stories and characters and times and settings.

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“For the reader interested in the specific history of one set of tales, or the complete story of Arthur, his knights, his queen, and Camelot, The Death of King Arthur is a great re

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“At barely more than 100 small (four and a half by seven inch) pages in Andrew Bromfield’s excellent English translation The Hall of the Singing Caryatids succeeds both as a novell

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A series of prose vignettes, an extended verse poem and a sequence of short meditations form the three sections of this bilingual collection.

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“Sorry has all the ingredients to make it a compulsive read. It’s slick, chock full of twists and turns, and dripping with narrative thrust and intrigue. . . .

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“On the credit side, Mr. Drvenkar’s narrative and dialogue are strong and move each section of the story along. He selects his words with care . . .

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“Besides the deftly rendered plot to uncover a conspiracy—which may remind a few readers of another sexually adventurous girl who kicks over a hornet’s nest even if she lacks a dragon tatto

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“Each poem reaches a moment when the mood changes, a moment of epiphany that jolts the reader out of his comfort zone and the everyday shimmers slightly as perspectives shift.”

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“. . . the entire poetic oeuvre of Israeli poet, feminist, and peace activist Dahlia Ravikovitch . . .”

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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen meets Young X-Men . . .”

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Skinny, by Diana Spechler is as divine, decadent, and sumptuous as a gourmet dessert.

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This collection of short nonfiction accounts is linked by a common thread of veracity and sincerity that has one reading through the whole gamut of emotions from humor to pathos.

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“A story is like a dance. It takes at least two people to make it come to life, the one who does the telling and the one who does the listening.”

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Told in blank verse, this story of the early pirates touches on a universal theme of children growing up without adequate adult role models.

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Robert Olen Butler, best known for A Good Scent From a Strange Mountain, his 1993 Pulitzer-Prize winning collection of short stories, has been turning out first-rate fiction for three deca

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