LGBTQ+

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“this is a lovely, five-star-worthy novel for young readers that is well written and deserves full applause.”

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“It would not be surprising in the least, and very much welcome, if The Bruising of Qilwa were to eventually grow into a full-length novel.”

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“I did not know how to explain this stubborn love for my parents that I staggered under, iridescent and gigantic and veined with a terrible grief, grief for the ways their lives had been compost fo

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“With wonderful writing, Alyssa Songsiridej has created an exploration of how romantic relationships can and often do evolve . .

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Greenland is another fine contribution to a growing canon of Black queer fiction.”

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“In lyrical, often shimmering, language, Mirosevich finds meaning and memory in the lives lived  by the . . . sea . . .”

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“In The Town of Babylon, Alejandro Varela, whose educational background is in public health, combines a social scientist’s powers of observation and analysis with a master writer’s

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Eleutheria . . .

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“The suspense of both the investigation and Brandstetter’s home life drives Death Claims as an elegant and compelling page-turner.”

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“Fadeout marks the debut of one of the 20th century’s most memorable investigators.

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Here’s to Us catalogs so many of the things that are weird and precious and sacred about being young people discovering who they are.

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Tell Me How to Be . . . offers one view of what it is like to be an Indian American in contemporary America.”

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“Selva Almada manages to get inside the minds of her characters.”

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It is interesting to note how many works of generic gay fiction (mysteries, romance), which one would think would be a male province, are written by women under male pen names (eg.

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This is a unique novel that is compelling, engrossing, and full of suspense and surprise.

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“wonderful and deeply engaging. The Membranes is a marvelous book.”

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All the Water I’ve Seen Is Running is a worthy addition to the group of fine recent novels about gay men of color looking for their own sense of racial and ethnic identity as well

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On the eve of World War II, inspired by a visit to the home of philosopher and gay rights advocate Edward Carpenter and his partner George Merrill, E. M.

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Bath Haus is not just excellent gay fiction . . . absorbing and exciting . . .”

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“Matthew Clark Davison’s Doubting Thomas is an absorbing story of a gay man who finally learns to love.”

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The Chosen and the Beautiful offers up a lush glimpse of decadence and corruption, interrogating America’s dark history through the eyes of a narrator it is impossible to forget.”

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Jonathan Lee’s fourth novel, The Great Mistake, opens in slyly reportorial fashion, queuing up both a dense biographical backstory and a baffling murder: “The last attempt on the life of A

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“In a tumultuous time of instability and uncertainty, Nathan Harris brings to the foreground humanity’s aptitude for survival, compassion, and goodwill even in their darkest hour.”

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In the summer of 1981 came the New York Times’ article about “Forty-one homosexuals turning up in emergency rooms with a spectrum of mysterious and lethal symptoms.” Forty years later ther

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