LGBTQ

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“Hockney’s creative output had taken a marked turn. Working in three dimensions changed his relationship to space. It enhanced his vision further the way his deafness had . . .

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“Those who have been waiting a long time for this new addition to the Shadowhunters series will be thrilled with the story brought to them by Clare and Chu.”

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Ardent was the word that Joshua Speed, Abraham Lincoln’s best friend, used to describe Lincoln’s wife Mary Todd.

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Shane was used to people asking if he was a boy or a girl. He was used to people sometimes assuming he was a girl because of his slender body and long blond hair.

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“Lot is far from a bleak read. Washington’s language takes the dense texture of poverty and turns into poetry.”

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“Sycamore seems to be forcing the reader to look at social injustices in a way that makes us realize the world is unfair.”

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“Castellani delivers a touching, and often eloquent dramatization of one of the most legendary gay couples in theatrical history.”

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“Feltman’s supreme ability to capture the emotional reality of her characters’ lives compels the reader forward. . . . a successful debut . . .”

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“It is a novel replete with the joy, cynicism, excitement, frustration, and other deep emotions that we often find accompanying any worthwhile, profound learning experience.”

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A Ladder to the Sky is not a book you want to love.

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This is a beautiful book that spans from the 1920s to the 1960s. It tells the story of Dara, a young woman who falls in love with another young woman called Rhodie.

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Sean, the main character in this novel, tells us there are two types of psychopaths. The first type is completely oblivious to their wrongdoing and can normalize even the most savage behavior.

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Evan Fallenberg’s novel The Parting Gift takes the reader through the emotional turmoil of love, lust, trust, and mistrust that often accompanies affairs of the heart.

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This is a love story between two women who are the complete opposites of each other.

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Reader warning: This review contains spoilers.

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“For readers interested in the deeper mysteries of human relationships, Maggie Terry delivers, with Schulman addressing the more trenchant mystery of how people and communities reb

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“this collection refreshes an esteemed opinion of Rich’s invaluable contributions to poetry and feminist thought.”

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History of Violence is not, as the title suggests, a big, fat tome about human aggression, brute force, and cruelty, though it describes a world in which violence shapes the life of the na

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Alan Hollinghurst’s novel, The Sparsholt Affair, presents a bit of a conundrum.

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In 1922 the British author Vita Sackville-West was commissioned to write a story and inscribe it in her own hand into a beautifully bound, tooled leather book.

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While it seems to be universally the case that authors would rather have their books written about than not, it is also the case that it is sometimes better not to review a given book than to revie

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“a fast, funny, and rip-roaring adventure of a few days in the life of an orc who’d like to forget his former association with a certain elf, and the elf who’s fighting against awakening ol

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What should “A Reader” attempt to do? One looks for it to provide an overview of an author’s work. The reader is a book that should be suitable for the classroom and instruction.

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“an exciting police procedural combining the tense search for a missing child with the personal involvement of a police chief mistrusted by a good many of the people on the case.”

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