LGBTQ+

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On the eve of World War II, inspired by a visit to the home of philosopher and gay rights advocate Edward Carpenter and his partner George Merrill, E. M.

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Bath Haus is not just excellent gay fiction . . . absorbing and exciting . . .”

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“Matthew Clark Davison’s Doubting Thomas is an absorbing story of a gay man who finally learns to love.”

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The Chosen and the Beautiful offers up a lush glimpse of decadence and corruption, interrogating America’s dark history through the eyes of a narrator it is impossible to forget.”

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Jonathan Lee’s fourth novel, The Great Mistake, opens in slyly reportorial fashion, queuing up both a dense biographical backstory and a baffling murder: “The last attempt on the life of A

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“In a tumultuous time of instability and uncertainty, Nathan Harris brings to the foreground humanity’s aptitude for survival, compassion, and goodwill even in their darkest hour.”

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In the summer of 1981 came the New York Times’ article about “Forty-one homosexuals turning up in emergency rooms with a spectrum of mysterious and lethal symptoms.” Forty years later ther

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Salih has the potential to be a good writer.

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“Nava is an impassioned writer who has once again created a fascinating picture of Los Angeles at an earlier, less enlightened time, centering on gay men trying to shed the shame they have

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Ilana Masad’s debut novel All My Mother’s Lovers is an in-depth exploration of family dynamics, the miscommunications and resentments that sometimes span lifetimes, and the moments of rede

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Critics for years have argued about whether T. S. Eliot was a closeted homosexual.

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The Four Profound Weaves is a beautifully articulated exploration of queer identity and transformation.

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Memorial is a deeply moving book by a young novelist with a unique voice and a strong sense of optimism.”

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“There is no question that Nemerever is a gifted writer. The rich style, precise in description and filled with witty metaphor, carries one along.”

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Lee and Adriano are a gay couple on sabbatical from their public relations tech firm to Orvieto, Italy, who become ensnared in an international conspiracy involving the death of Andrea, a Catholic

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Skill and craftsmanship ooze from this beautiful novel. It would be a cliché to just say that it’s well written because that wouldn’t do the book full justice.

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“‘Murder him. . . . I can’t see any other way out,’ counsels Abbé Pierre as he hands Yvonne the lethal drug. . . . ‘You’ll grieve. You’ll mourn.

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Winner of the 2020 International Book Award for LGBTQ Fiction, Carousel is the debut novel of April Ford and the story of a middle-aged woman caught between the buried emotional impact of

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This Town Sleeps is genuinely enjoyable. It has threads of mystery and romance. It combines humor and horror. It’s a good book . . .”

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The literary rumor mill portrays Naoise Dolan as the new Sally Rooney, and that suggestion alone might push a writer onto the bestseller list these days.

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Mostly Dead Things is an odd creature: a book widely recommended and popularly listed, but marked by a fundamental discomfort that defies mainstream appeal.

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Boys of Alabama is a beautiful book that carries the reader along on a tide of rich, eloquent language.”

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“eminently readable and emotionally intense.”

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T. J. Klune’s latest title could be the lovechild of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Ransom Riggs) and a Nora Roberts’ second chances, found family romance.

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