Short Stories

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Is it better to read a story collection sequentially?

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“has greater resonance, the characters are older, have lived more, have more to say. As a result, the stories are . . . more rewarding . . .”

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“Using her remarkable, literary voice to investigate the psychological experiences of victims, Oates requires that we willingly suspend our disbelief and reject realism as a means to identi

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Caroline Bock’s hybrid collection, Carry Her Home, could be the collection to read in 2020 for several reasons, most notably because it focuses on family, home, and loss.

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“deeply evocative, eminently readable . . .”

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“although McNally’s stories seem unbelievable at first, they throb with a recognizable human heartbeat, powered by love and regret and the mystery of life.”

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This is Shruti Swamy’s debut collection of stories. She is not a debut author. She writes with sureness and grace. Her writing is more poetry than prose.

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“Exquisite, poignant, engrossing . . .

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“Issued as a paperback original, Love & Other Crimes is a perfect match for summer’s relaxing moments, whether they are long ones on vacation or short breathers between home-ba

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Readers will find Zadie Smith’s short story collection a mixed bag with a few interesting bits and pieces, and a few good short works.

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And I Do Not Forgive You is uneven, but where it shines, it’s wonderful.”

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The thing about a smorgasbord is that you don’t need to savor every offering to feel happily fed.

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Among the masterful short story writers of the 18th century in Russia—Turgenev, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy—it is Anton Chekhov whose words are most known outside of the motherland because

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Forty stories in 160 pages. Short: some one page, a couple, four to five pages. Short: but with a bang. Short: You will read in a flash and say, “What was that?”

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“brimming with verve and wisdom.”

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“Thammavongsa says vital things about the immigrant experience: how refugees strive to fit in and yet retain cultural traditions; how race is entwined with class; and how family is, in the

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Hopefully your life is so good that the word “diabolical” never need enter your mind or cross your lips.

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This short story collection by Newbery Award-winner Madeleine L’Engle, published posthumously by her granddaughter, is aimed more at L’Engle scholars and devoted fans than recreational readers fami

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The world of fantasy is alive with short fiction, and those wild-growing stories are bundled together by a league of anthologists who carefully arrange tales by theme.

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“All of the pieces in Heathcliff Redux possess moments of brilliance and reflect Lily Tuck’s tremendous craftmanship.”

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Fabulous as in “resembling or suggesting a fable.” But in this book, not necessarily “of an incredible, astonishing, or exaggerated nature.” Definition from Merriam-Webster

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Staten Island Stories concerns ugly times and circumstances, but the people and the stories are beautiful.”

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One of the best things about Cutting Edge: New Stories of Mystery and Crime by Women Writers, edited by Joyce Carol Oates, is that it is so very Joyce Carol Oates, every story imbued with

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The Best American Short Stories anthology has been published yearly and without interruption since 1915.

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“If you go down to the woods today,
You better not go alone.
It’s lovely down in the woods today,
But safer to stay at home.”
The Teddy Bears’ Picnic

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