Short Stories

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It’s been 15 years since Akashic Books gave us Los Angeles Noir, a collection of crime stories set around the vast basin from Mulholland Drive to Los Feliz, from Pacific Palisades to Belmo

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“We’re in the presence of an author both wholly assured and tentative, both nagged by the complexities of narrative and able to exploit them.”

“In these stories, we inhabit the lives of the characters, yes, but the stories behind them also tell us about ourselves.”

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“While many of the stories contained within The Way Spring Arrives and Other Stories flirt with inexplicability, their charm and freshness cut through translation barriers.”

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The stories in Maggie Shipstead’s You Have a Friend in 10A were published in literary journals between 2009 and 2017.

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Joyce Carol Oates’ tales are unsettling, disquieting, some endings left hanging, leaving readers with questions that implicate more horror yet to come to

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The Angel of Rome is highly recommended. The stories represent some of Walter’s best writing.”

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Hilary Mantel is best known in America as the author of the historical trilogy, Wolf Hall, Bring up the Bodies, and The Mirror & The Light.

The Partition is a wide-ranging collection of nine short stories focusing on aging, loneliness, sexual identity, the brutal competition in the movie industry (“Late in the Day” and “Les ho

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“Crime Hits Home is a worthy addition to every crime fiction fan’s bookshelf.”

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“In lyrical, often shimmering, language, Mirosevich finds meaning and memory in the lives lived  by the . . . sea . . .”

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We seldom find a book that we have hoped for like this one.

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How Strange a Season contains six short stories and a novella plus a seventh short story that follows the novella and could have been included in it.

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“This is delightful old-school mystery fiction, filled with humor, suspense, and a knack for twisty surprises that Lovesey has made all his own.”

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“Richard Thomas, the award-winning author of three novels, three short story collections, and over 150 stories in print, does not disappoint with his latest collection of short stories . .

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“a new generation will fall in love with this beautiful, witty, and modern descendant of Grimm’s Fairy Tales . . .

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Before the Holocaust, about three million Jews lived in Poland. After the Shoah, only about four thousand Jews remained alive there. That number is about the same today.

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“The assortment of ethnicities and grudges displayed in Paris Noir: The Suburbs could become a treasure chest of resources for any noir author seeking a more gruesome approach or a

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“demonstrates the power of storytelling in our everyday lives and how it might be a good idea to listen more carefully to the stories that others are telling us.”

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“Hyperbole and exaggeration are the definition of camp, an air of performance also part of the package, and Walker’s characters obligingly give the impression of always being always in desp

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“‘Why am I here?’ he keeps asking, up until his inevitable execution at which point his keeper finally answers: No more questions.’

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“At times uproariously funny, uncannily accurate, and glaringly insightful, David Butler’s Fugitive is a collective exposé on human nature delivered in entertaining snippets with s

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Medusa’s Ankles opens with a haunting and strangely gentle ghost story (‘A July Ghost’) and ends with a terse contemporary fable about our feckless destruction of the planet (‘Sea

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“Midnight Hour operates from a stimulating conceit: an anthology of 20 crime stories, all taking place at midnight, all written by writers of color.”

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