World Literature

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“a disturbing and thoughtful novel, almost surreal at times. . . .

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“A delightful children’s book . . . The Three Princes of Serendip is easy to share, lovely to contemplate, and a perfect addition to the story time shelf.”

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“succeeds, thanks to Seckin’s unrelentingly honest excavations and sharply beautiful language.”

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Small Things Like These is a succinct, heart and soul story of a man coming to terms with a consciousness born of his personal narrative.

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Harsh Times by Mario Vargas Llosa recounts a disastrous event in the past, but it is also highly relevant in this era of disinformation, extremis

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Klara Hveberg has written a stunning debut novel about unrequited love, longing, obsession, betrayal, and more.

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“the suspenseful action and Hausman’s engaging prose make Sleepless worth the effort.”

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“Moving from staccato reportage to evocative scenes, the book works as a sort of collage of information, replicating in its stylistic choices the different lenses used to understand history

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“It is in death that we become meaningless . . . but the living will continue to seek their destinies.”

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“Few fiction writers have captured the trauma of India’s partition as powerfully as Saadat Hasan Manto, called ‘the undisputed master of the modern Indian short story’ by Salman Rushdie.”

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“this novel offers the pleasures of a poetic travelogue and an homage to a place and culture . . .”

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“A character study of one woman’s humanity and sacrifice.”

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“Layered and lethal . . . The only thing better than the pleasure of this suspenseful and tightly plotted ‘Scandi noir’ investigation is knowing there’s a sequel on the way.”

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Disquiet by Zulfu Livaneli, Turkey’s bestselling author as well as noted political advocate, is a short but powerful novel that might well be described as a political treatise wrapped in a

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“This is a short novel of subtle gear changes, where the seemingly obvious plot becomes a distraction to the true narrative that builds and builds and accelerates through a shifting geograp

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Meeting in Positano: A Novel by Goliarda Sapienza (1924–1996) is a disorienting experience for anyone who likes their fact and fiction to be distinct genres.

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“For most immigrants, the streets of America’s urban communities were paved with stones, not gold.” 

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“For those who want a close-up portrait of a complex society with a rich history and plenty of contradictions, My Old Home is an excellent place to begin.”

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Jacob Dinezon (1851–1919) has been a commanding figure in late 19th century Eastern European Jewish literature.

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The Twilight Zone is a novel about the long and brutal dictatorship led by Augusto Pinochet in Chile from 1973 to 1990, yes.

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps her House is the type of novel you finish and then return to Chapter One to begin again.

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This is the latest in Akashic Books city noir series set in Africa. The 13 stories visit various locations in Accra, all of which show the poverty but hope of the people who survive there.

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The Danger of Smoking in Bed underlines the darkness of evil.

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The Children’s Train is a sympathetic, well-crafted novel filled with vacation-worthy sights and authentic experiences from an Italy that balances folk tradition with modernity.”

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“With its hint of the occult and a powerful storyline, The Witch Hunter is a thoroughly chilling thriller making a solid entry as a first novel in a new series.”

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