World Literature

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Veronica Gerber Bicecci’s debut novel, second book and her first translated into English, Empty Set (Conjunto vacío), has multiple dualities—the verbal and the visual, th

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“Interesting, intriguing, and informative, Fools and Mortals is highly recommended.”

Interesting, Intriguing, Informative

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“Dark Echoes of the Past is a literary treat for fans of noir . . .”

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October–November 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik coup d’etat that brought communism to power in Russia.

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“A stunning debut novel. The Resurrection of Joan Ashby by Cherise Wolas encompasses a wealth of superb writing, mature insights, and breathtaking risks . . .”

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Seventy-four years ago, nine years before the publication of The Second Sex and 20 years before The Feminine Mystique, a male Turkish communist novelist created a fictional femini

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“a lovely installment, if a brief one, filled with amusing events, and a slowly mounting sense of dread . . .”

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Forest Dark, Nicole Krass’ fourth and most interior, introspective, cerebral, and autobiographical novel to date, is about two Jewish-American characters.

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There are not many recent novels about life in Iran.

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“great fun and a spectacular read. The story of the Carrion King story is so good that you’ll want it to be real. . . .

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“a delightful book, guaranteed to promote snickers, chuckles, and a guffaw or two.”

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“Glass Houses is a Triple Crown winner for plot, characterization, and setting. . . .

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Orly Castel-Bloom is best known for her 1992 (2010 in English translation) dystopian darkly satirical post-modern science fiction novel Dolly City (also reviewed in NYJB), which has been i

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“Compass educates us, even as we marvel at its obscurity.”

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Tomoyuki Hoshino, born 1965, is one of Japan’s more compelling younger writers, but he remains virtually unknown abroad.

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Nobody does Kafkaesque quite like Franz Kafka.

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“I had a friend once. Indeed, at the time, I only had one friend. His names was Andrés and he lived in Paris and, much to my his delight, I travelled to that city to see him.

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“Free of Vikings, Björk, or enraptured paeans to volcanic landscapes and icy shores, The Outlaw presents Iceland as experienced by a troubled boy.

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“a psychological puzzle box that ultimately explores multiple levels of illicit passions.”

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“From Italy’s agricultural heartland, largely an autodidact, Walter Ferranini doubts the sincerity of claims for the dignity accorded labor by ideological spokesmen for the post-war communist regim

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Of all Mozart’s piano sonatas, No. 11, “Turkish March,” is the most unique. It’s also his best. And Mathias Énard seems to know why.

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Nietzsche declared God was dead over a hundred years ago, but contemporary readers can’t get enough of religion.

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“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

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Ayelet Gundar-Goshen’s (One Night, Markovitch) second novel Waking Lions starts as a moral drama in its first 14 chapters and becomes a suspenseful crime thriller in its final 11.

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“Listen up, Netanya baby! We’re gonna throw down the mother of all shows tonight . . . Yeah, open up that hook, table ten, set ’em free . . . there you go!”

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