Nonfiction

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Jaron Lanier, an early developer of Virtual Reality, presents his manifesto, his state-of-the-union address of the cultural impact of the Internet and the Web. He has been prescient in the past.

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In 1990 Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar wrote Barbarians at the Gate, the account of the leveraged buyout of RJR Nabisco.

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Jason Siff advises “what to do when the instructions get in the way.” That is, for both beginning and experienced meditation students, he encourages practitioners to relax.

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Cockroaches will endure after the final mushroom cloud disappears; similarly, the financial industrial complex—the economists, traders, bankers, regulators, and journalists—will continue to try to

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IIn the small town where I live, not so many years ago conservative religious groups raised a ruckus when the local school board proposed adding yoga to the district’s physical education curriculum

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Although The New Rules of Marketing and PR is an update of the 2007 first edition book of the same name, it can also be considered as a sequel to Jay Conrad Levinson’s seminal Guerilla

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 Communication has been described as being what a person hears, not what another  person says.

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Mr. Mortimer has brought to the study of the American Civil War the biography of Pryce Lewis.

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The notion of choosing is so complex that there are now two popular books on the subject. Each was written by an author who is an expert in their field of study.

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Take a quick skim through Supper for a Song, and your first thought may be, “Wow, songs sure must cost more in Britain.” This book will pull readers in with its attractive layout and photo

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This historically accurate book, a real gift to children, explains the effective and admirable life of Effa Manley, the first important female baseball clubowner.

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Small business consultants know that people talk about 90% of the time and communicate about 10%.

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In a more innocent time in New York City, before the 9/11 catastrophe, Richard Gallin cavalierly counseled his under-achieving son, “Pretend to be a thing all your life and at the end of your life,

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In Paris Under Water, history professor and director of the Environmental Studies program at Memphis’ Rhodes College, Jeffrey Jackson, reconstructs a little-known story of civic disaster f

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Sean Ferrell’s daring first novel, Numb, is a Barthian fable which endeavors to chart a course through the murky waters of sensory overload in the modern world.

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Eloquent Books, June 2009

A Picture Book That Encourages Children to Believe In Themselves

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Scott Rasmussen and Douglas Schoen obviously hurried to get Mad as Hell on the market before the November midterm elections. They should have waited.

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The latest edition of the Legal Guide for the Visual Artist is more than just the fifth edition of the venerable tome; it is also the fifth edition of the book that author Tad Crawford fir

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Though the subtitle is bit tongue in cheek, this book is practical, imaginative, and encouraging.

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In this first new collection of essays in five years, poet, fiction writer, essayist, and Kentucky farmer Wendell Berry delivers a basketful of ripe fruit, like the symbolic red raspberries on the

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"To err is human,” we are informed by the authors of How They Blew It: The CEOs and Entrepreneurs Behind Some of the World’s Most Catastrophic Business Failures.

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The cliché is that we live in an age of celebrity—where even our current president is revered more for the role each of us projects on him (Avatar of racial progress? Pioneer of multiculturalism?

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Sara Rose begins her story For All the Tea in China, this way: “There was a time when maps of the world were redrawn in the name of plants, when two empires, Britain and China, went to war

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The “recovered alcoholic fighting to stay sober” tale is not new territory, so Burroughs isn’t sharing something new with his readers.

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