Political & Social Science

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“The aim of Useful Delusions, a very readable book, is to teach us to be more rational about our irrationality, to not make the latter our enemy, but to recognize how it may help a

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In just 170 pages Isabel Allende manages to write a humorous memoir, an homage to her family, all of whom seem to have walked off the pages of her delicious novels, and a feminist plea for women’s

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“[I]n a world beset by scientific illiteracy and misinformation, Isaacson is the gene whisperer we so desperately need.”

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This little book is as candid and charming as its cover, and not coincidentally the kind of book its author, Lennie Goodings, likes best.

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“Bury me north of the Mason-Dixon line, in a white suit and a plain coffin.” —Louise Fitzhugh

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From the start it is clear Floating in a Most Peculiar Way is going to be a journey of discovery like few others. Not many people can say they are from a country that no longer exists.

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“How to Avoid a Climate Disaster is a primer for every citizen and a checklist for specialists to make sure they have the big picture.”                            

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“To be able to brag that your son or daughter was accepted at Harvard or Yale or Stanford checked off a box for status-hungry parents.

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Koa Beck’s book, White Feminism: From Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind, comes with a rather double- or even triple-edged endorsement from Gloria Steinem; “Don’t judge

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“The author knows that ‘to erase stigma, all of us—those in the medical community as well as laypeople—need to be less judgmental about mental illness in ourselves and in others and learn t

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“a suspense-filled, heart-pounding narrative that succeeds in painting a picture of what it is really like to serve on the frontlines of the US armed forces.”

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Nearly two dozen outstanding articles on climate change, just in time for the U.S. return to the Paris accords. Now, what?

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American history is “littered with utopian experiments that began with giddy promise and ended in depressing failure,” writes Thomas Healy. In Soul City, he tells one such story.

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The role of the news establishment and the American newspaper has undergone several profound transformations in American history.

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Dear Ms. Schubert is an admirable addition to international literature, a gift to the English-speaking world . . .”

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“To be born in the street means to wander all your life, to be free. It means accident and incident, drama, movement. It means above all dream . . .”

—Henry Miller

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“Norberg’s ability to distill lessons for today from thousands of years of world history will stimulate and enlighten both general readers and professional scholars.”

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“chronicles the century-long struggle following the Civil War by Black Americans and other people of color for true civil and social rights, particularly the right to engage in interracial—

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“Thank you, Megan Rapinoe, for a book that is so courageously honest, thought-provoking, informative, and inspiring.

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“Cities truly have occupied a unique place in human history and civilization and this timely book certainly relates how cities have become so critically important to humanity’s rise.”

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“Guthrie, from what we learn, is part of a bigger picture, challenging the 'simple narrative' of individual freedom of expression."

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