Literary Fiction

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Isabel Allende is a wonderful storyteller. Her distinct voice and her vivid imagination have delighted readers for many years now.

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“Pankaj Mishra’s new novel is no less stimulating and insightful than anything else he has written, although there’s no tightly hewn plot here—and the drama that matters is internal.”

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“Past and present, fact and fiction loop and intersect, echoes of history filter into modern life . . .”

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“a tale of love—platonic, familial, romantic—and of forgiveness and growth, along with acceptance of what life doles out.”

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One of the joys of reading literature is discovering an astute author’s powers of observation and finding these deliciously woven throughout the narrative.

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“a fascinating piece of writing from a master storyteller”

New Year is a novel about uncontrollable panic, repressed trauma, and the psychological patterns that persist in their aftermath.

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“Ultimately, Perpetual West is an engaging tapestry of ideas.”

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Hidden women abound in all sectors of society, nearly all cultures, and throughout history, threatening powerful, dominant men who fear losing their power and prestige.

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To Paradise illustrates the power of narrative to make sense of our chaotic lives and even to endow them with beauty.

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“This is Joella’s first novel, and it’s an assured performance, full of nicely observed detail. It may not have a Big Theme, but it has lots and lots of heart.”

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“succeeds, thanks to Seckin’s unrelentingly honest excavations and sharply beautiful language.”

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Louise Nealon has been, fairly and unfairly, compared to Sally Rooney, and with her first novel, Snowflake, she seems poised for prizes and movie adaptations.

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Tell Me How to Be . . . offers one view of what it is like to be an Indian American in contemporary America.”

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Medusa’s Ankles opens with a haunting and strangely gentle ghost story (‘A July Ghost’) and ends with a terse contemporary fable about our feckless destruction of the planet (‘Sea

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“at a single-word turning point the context shifts and all previous assumptions are cast aside . . .”

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Small Things Like These is a succinct, heart and soul story of a man coming to terms with a consciousness born of his personal narrative.

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“Owen is a master storyteller and creator of consistent plotting and pacing, seamlessly navigated with characters that are real flesh and blood, and sometimes deeply flawed.”

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In the compactly rich novel The Femme Fatale Hypothesis, author David Roth presents three equal protagonists and places them in an urgent, and at the same time leisurely, path to and throu

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“This sustained compelling storytelling like Lehane and French, now in Reuland’s hands, lifts Brooklyn Supreme far above a conventional cop or legal novel into tormented wrestling

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Harsh Times by Mario Vargas Llosa recounts a disastrous event in the past, but it is also highly relevant in this era of disinformation, extremis

The Teller of Secrets by Bisi Adjapon is a coming of age, character-based novel that follows Esi’s first-person recounting of her girlhood in newly independent Ghana in the 1960s.

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The Sentence is a love letter to the written word, to books, and to those who sell them.”

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Allan Gurganus planted his flag on the literary landscape in 1989 with The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All.

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Gary Shteyngart’s latest novel, Our Country Friends, is billed as “The Big Chill meets Chekhov.” Whether this potential mash-up intrigues you depends on your love of ’80s movies a

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