Families

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“Flynn Berry landed major awards for her two earlier thrillers, and Northern Spy merits more of the same.”

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“Original, informative, suspenseful—the big three in a literary slam bang.”

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Let’s face it, a book centered around the wretched child abuse of a large family at the hands of a demented religious fanatic has some inherent drama to it.

Burnt Sugar explores security and permanence, the lengths to which people go in search of what they were denied as children.”

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Marvelous and painful, truthful and penetrating, this novel, with every page, requires the reader to sense, to live in and cherish the present moment.

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It’s 2008, Barack Obama has been elected president. Ruth Tuttle and her husband Xavier are excited about what lies ahead for them.

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“. . . supremely skilled writing even though the plot goes missing in action early on.”

This is an odd duck of a book, no question about it.

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How many who have been forced to deal with a life crisis can start over—and in a tropical setting, no less? Irene Steele’s life is turned upside down after learning  

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What would you do if you were in a plane crash, but managed to survive? Being so close to death, it's only logical anyone would reassess their life.

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Natalie Harper hates her job at Pinnacle Fine Wines in Sonoma County, California, but the pay and benefits are worth it.

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“the underlying message of the book is that no matter how well loved and well supported you are, bad things can happen that aren’t your fault, and they can mess you up no matter what you do

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“two generations come to understand each other and find the true meaning of family.”

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The Gordons of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, spend every summer at the century-old saltbox passed down from Ed Gordon's grandparents.

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“the unique personalities of the complex characters along with a bit of mystery make this an involving read.

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“Meyerson does an admirable job of answering the question she posed to herself, and by the end of the story, ties up all the loose ends that she tossed out to the reader from the beginning.

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Many of today's families are blended with step-siblings and half-siblings.

“Overall, this is a reasonably good story that could have been much stronger. . . . The ending ties everything together but feels too pat and maybe a little too cute.

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“a nuanced exploration of family jealousies, mental illness, and repercussions that reverberate throughout generations.”

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The Country Guesthouse is an enjoyable, quick read.

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A year has passed, and Irene Steele is still trying to understand how her husband Russ could have deceived her.

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In her latest novel, New York Times bestselling author Alison McGhee tackles a moral conundrum that promises to push all the buttons around freedom of choice.

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“Overall, a disappointment . . .”

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Everyone knows about the migration crisis that erupted out of the Syrian civil war.

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Sixteen-year-old Brin Collins believes her life is falling apart. It all began when Delia, her mother got pregnant.

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