Coming of Age

Mr. Wilder and Me is, in part, a homage to the great film director and producer, Billy Wilder, and his screenwriter/friend, Iz Diamond.

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In the early- to mid-20th century, a state school named Willowbrook was located in Staten Island, New York.

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“lyrical beauty of Manfredi’s prose . . . at its heart, The Empire of Dirt is a rich puzzle impossible to resist.”

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“I did not know how to explain this stubborn love for my parents that I staggered under, iridescent and gigantic and veined with a terrible grief, grief for the ways their lives had been compost fo

Cyclorama is a stunning novel that weaves together past and present while reflecting on and questioning Anne Frank’s timeless assertion, “In spite of everything, I still believe that peopl

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“With wonderful writing, Alyssa Songsiridej has created an exploration of how romantic relationships can and often do evolve . .

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Nineteen-year-old Avery helps her mother give birth to a baby boy who dies within ten minutes. While her female siblings care for their mother, Avery is given the task of burying the child.

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Holding Her Breath is a generational story written in descriptive language with steady pacing. . . .

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“soars on the strength of language and passion for the ideas [the author] works hard to depict here, so that if you loved The Sympathizer, and you don’t mind the insistent history

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Louise Nealon has been, fairly and unfairly, compared to Sally Rooney, and with her first novel, Snowflake, she seems poised for prizes and movie adaptations.

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In this debut, Huisman has already given her readers a richly textured portrait of an enthralling woman you might love as a dinner companion—but never as your mother.”

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“Whether Jim Shepard is a prophet or just a great writer with a clever concept, we’ll probably never really know.

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In Marisa Silver’s book, The Mysteries, she tackles the conundrum of relationships—of family, of friends, of children, of adults. And therein lies the mystery of the title.

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This book is a good example of how packaging and promotion can hit or miss with an audience.

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“A unique and heartfelt story that taps into an uncommon family dynamic, showcasing how love is resilient and healing, even among the broken and the brokenhearted.”

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“Sathian, who writes with great assurance and verve, wields her pen like a magnifying lens to examine the foibles of immigrants who are high achievers but somewhat insular and insecure.”

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“Readers eagerly await more from a writer whose finger is on the pulse of the 21st century.

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A Crooked Tree is a sonorous ode to youth with all its innocence, angst, disillusionment, and unfiltered honesty.

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The Fortunate Ones is a fathoms-deep exploration of love, loyalty, and the ties that bind, written masterfully from all angles.

White Ivy is a suspenseful novel with a protagonist who is intentionally portrayed as an anti-heroine.

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“We learn of a father’s love, a mother’s brokenness, disparity between brothers and sisters, yet, in the ugliest or most beautiful of exchanges, true kinship and bonds are discovered.”

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Jane, the so-called “Pizza Girl” of this debut novel by Jean Kyoung Frazier, lives in her own head. She works at a takeout pizza joint, delivering pizzas to a regular crew of characters.

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“it’s the perennial conflict between motherhood and career, but not the way most readers might expect.”

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