Coming of Age

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In this debut, Huisman has already given her readers a richly textured portrait of an enthralling woman you might love as a dinner companion—but never as your mother.”

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“Whether Jim Shepard is a prophet or just a great writer with a clever concept, we’ll probably never really know.

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In Marisa Silver’s book, The Mysteries, she tackles the conundrum of relationships—of family, of friends, of children, of adults. And therein lies the mystery of the title.

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This book is a good example of how packaging and promotion can hit or miss with an audience.

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“A unique and heartfelt story that taps into an uncommon family dynamic, showcasing how love is resilient and healing, even among the broken and the brokenhearted.”

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“Sathian, who writes with great assurance and verve, wields her pen like a magnifying lens to examine the foibles of immigrants who are high achievers but somewhat insular and insecure.”

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“Readers eagerly await more from a writer whose finger is on the pulse of the 21st century.

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A Crooked Tree is a sonorous ode to youth with all its innocence, angst, disillusionment, and unfiltered honesty.

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The Fortunate Ones is a fathoms-deep exploration of love, loyalty, and the ties that bind, written masterfully from all angles.

White Ivy is a suspenseful novel with a protagonist who is intentionally portrayed as an anti-heroine.

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Miss Iceland is a beautiful novel about artistic aspiration and friendship. The storytelling sparkles . . .”

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“We learn of a father’s love, a mother’s brokenness, disparity between brothers and sisters, yet, in the ugliest or most beautiful of exchanges, true kinship and bonds are discovered.”

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Jane, the so-called “Pizza Girl” of this debut novel by Jean Kyoung Frazier, lives in her own head. She works at a takeout pizza joint, delivering pizzas to a regular crew of characters.

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“it’s the perennial conflict between motherhood and career, but not the way most readers might expect.”

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Nothing More Dangerous is the next best thing to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird . . .”

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In her latest novel, New York Times bestselling author Alison McGhee tackles a moral conundrum that promises to push all the buttons around freedom of choice.

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Few mothers can imagine having strong enough ties with their family that they would choose to leave a daughter behind. This is that story.

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“Schumann has an eye for detail, an ear for the rhythmical sentence, and a voice that is clear and resonant.”

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“Garcia has created a way for these four teens to challenge the way they view themselves, each other, their community, and what they each dream for their future.”

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“This just may be the perfect book for our times, when acknowledgement of common ground and empathy are sorely needed.”

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As we approach adulthood, we convince ourselves that the mental scripts that have defined us for nearly our entire lives can be discarded. Or altered. Or at least minimized.

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NARRATOR, QUIRKY

One who examines his tattered life by bringing together seemingly disparate elements from his past, both real and imagined. See REALITY.

REALITY

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Patrick “Pack” Walsh may not know exactly where he’s going in life, but he’s happy where he is. He’s got a girlfriend who gets him. His single dad is his best friend.

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Jefferson James raised his daughter Jillian when her mother took off after her birth. Throughout Jillian's life, she learned nothing about her mom, and her dad was close-mouthed about his past.

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