Nonfiction

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"To err is human,” we are informed by the authors of How They Blew It: The CEOs and Entrepreneurs Behind Some of the World’s Most Catastrophic Business Failures.

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The cliché is that we live in an age of celebrity—where even our current president is revered more for the role each of us projects on him (Avatar of racial progress? Pioneer of multiculturalism?

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Sara Rose begins her story For All the Tea in China, this way: “There was a time when maps of the world were redrawn in the name of plants, when two empires, Britain and China, went to war

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The “recovered alcoholic fighting to stay sober” tale is not new territory, so Burroughs isn’t sharing something new with his readers.

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What is it like to get shot in combat, to feel your life draining away and know there is nothing you can do to help yourself?

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“This shouldn’t be a book,” declares Stan Slap, 13 pages into Bury My Heart in Conference Room B: The Unbeatable Impact of Truly Committed Managers, “it should be a pamphlet.”

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This book is exactly what you hope it is, which is plenty.

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“Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope.

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Without a Word: How a Boy’s Unspoken Love Changed Everything, tells the story of the life of Hunter Kelly, a boy born with a fatal genetic disease called Krabbe Leukodystrophy.

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Bill Kirk’s non-fiction children’s book deals with how the heart works by educating youngsters about the human body.

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If there’s one thing that doesn’t quite compute, it’s reading about the nation’s dysfunctional economy while one of the greatest business resources of our time–the Internet–is changing the nature o

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This spring has seen the publication of the 360th edition from The Library of America, in a sense completing, at least for now, the full circle of the history of American literature.

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The title sets the stage for this closely documented telling of the case of Cynthia Stewart who boldly or innocently took nude photos of her eight-year-old daughter Nora one afternoon and sent them

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Successful musicians connect and relate to their audience on an emotional level. Often, they channel some great pain from their past in order to give their work an even deeper meaning.

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“[Elliot was] a muscular populist liberal who wasn’t afraid to confront business institutions by punching them in the nose.

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How the heck did Hewlett-Packard become the Peyton Place of Silicon Valley?

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If you are not yet familiar with Molly Wizenberg through her award-winning food blog, Orangette, you are in for a treat.

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In 1997, one bad decision environmental science writer and adventurer Jon Turk made during his 25 years of backcountry skiing triggered an avalanche that nearly did to him what kayaking and sailing

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Scientific Characters chronicles the events of “Datagate,” in which a prominent breast cancer researcher and oncologist falsified patient data in a landmark clinical trial.

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With a little background from his Three Cups of Tea, Greg Mortenson continues his unbelievable saga of his quest to build schools in “the last best place.” He insists on working in areas o

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Most wine writers were likely English or history majors or the like, and many wine books talk about the romance, mystery, and poetry of wine, and sometimes describe wines in anthropomorphic terms.

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Did you know that pay for performance schemes do not work and can actually be harmful to human motivation? Or that extrinsic motivation is detrimental to creativity?

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