Nonfiction

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A month before he left this life in 1989 at the age of 101, yoga master Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya told author A. G. Mohan what is most important in life: “Arogya. Ayus.

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 Get out of here! You’ve got to be kidding—vodka, Jell-O, and chocolate chips? No, she’s not joking, though Lisa Lillien does interlace this small paperback with a touch of whimsy and humor.

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The title of this riveting book comes from Robert Johnson’s blues song, “Hellhound on My Trail,” which is about being pursued by fate, by the law, and ultimately, death.

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Author Rus Bradburd loves the English language.

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The rich may be different from you and me, but that doesn’t mean they are any more interesting.

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Story vignettes are like hors d’oeuvres. They pique your interest, but they’re not very filling.

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“The darker the night the bolder the lion.” —Theodore Roosevelt

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The History Press, November 2009

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Many things come to mind at the mention of Gianni Versace—over-the-top glamour; his sister, Donatella; sexiness; and his untimely death—but Deborah Ball has given us deep background into much more

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A sequel to Dewey: The Small Town Library Cat Who Touched the World, this book is reminiscent of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series. Ms. Myron and Mr.

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"There were times . . . when Kelly felt desperate, confused and shattered. But she also felt embraced and loved. And that sustained her.”

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This autobiography is subtitled “the extraordinary career of a luxury retailing pioneer,” but there is a question which arises, and that is: “If you are a builder of shopping centers” does that qua

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“Yugoslavia should be proud of this small car. Everyone will be
talking about it in the United States.” —Malcolm Bricklin

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In 1984, one of the more unlikely lecture duos toured the country from one college auditorium to the next.

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It’s doubtful that anyone would wish to take the position that a modern American prison is the perfect example of a rehabilitative environment.

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Richard Dawkins is one of the most popular and widely read scientists alive today. Anyone who has read The Selfish Gene, or The Blind Watchmaker, will understand why.

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You Already Know How to Be Great reaches beyond coaches to managers, human resource professionals, teachers, parents—anyone whose role requires them to give performance feedback or periodi

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There seems to be no end to the number of businessmen, politicians, and coaches who, upon achieving success or some elevated position in their field, write a book claiming to have some insight into

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The purpose of this book can be found in the preface’s title: A Call for Energy Literacy.

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For anyone who has walked side-by-side in the culminating steps of the life of an elderly person, Ann Putnam’s Full Moon at Noontide is a healing balm. She understands.

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Sal Gilbertie and Larry Sheehan are clearly very good organic vegetable gardeners who have been at it for a long time.

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Carl Sandburg once said, “A woman is like a tea bag. It’s only when she’s in hot water that you realize how strong she is.” 

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 Jeffrey Kaye’s timely book, Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration, focuses on the impact of immigration worldwide.  The author uses the term “migrant” to describe

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