Designers, Muses & Personalities

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Do not be misled by the title of the book as most prospective readers will be expecting a large monograph filled with a plethora of glossy images using clothes from the Chanel archive.

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“Bill Cunningham was a New York institution, part of what made NYC the fashion capitol of the world.”

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René Lacoste created probably the most ubiquitous and enduring brand logo that comes to mind; decades before there was Ralph Lauren’s polo pony there was the Lacoste alligator.

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The recipe for the success of this monograph is equal parts Giles Deacon (brilliantly talented and visionary designer), Katie Grand (muse, editor and stylist for the biggest names in fashion) and

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House of Nutter: The Rebel Tailor of Savile Row is so much more than just the story of the trajectory of Tommy Nutter.

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Having reviewed six books dealing with the life of the Alexander McQueen and his oeuvre, it can be said that Rasmussen brings nothing new to the table.

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Before the prospective reader even opens Guo Pei: Couture Beyond, they need to be aware that this is not so much about haute couture but rather about the art and craft of haute couture; th

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Charles James: Portrait of an Unreasonable Man must be examined and evaluated on multiple levels: there is James the genius; James the spoiled narcissist; James the master networker; the s

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Before you even open the book and begin to take this journey, the reader is assured that this will not be Pulitzer or Nobel Prize material.

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It is a rare, if not an improbable occurrence, that a reader/reviewer/fashionphile can call a monograph such as Olivier Theyskens: She Walks in Beauty a haunting, moody, poetic, and yet wi

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There are libraries filled with books that celebrate the glories of fashion, but there are scant few books that can sit beside Norell: Master of American Fashion.

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Rarely does a reader get to enjoy the sensation of sheer joy while being reminded that there are indeed many reasons to buy, own, and read a book.

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One of the most difficult tasks for any writer is to convey emotions to the reader as well as to elicit an emotional response from the reader.

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Some will say who? Some will say why?

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It’s a bit difficult to wrap your head around that fact that Fiorucci is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

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“Visually and intellectually stimulating.”

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“Dior remains an endless reservoir for subject matter as rarely, if ever, has there been a book about Dior that is a disappointment.”

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This is a book that “serves two masters.” Obviously, by its title, it is a book that chronicles the oeuvre of Martin Margiela during his tenure as creative director at Hermès as well as serving as

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There are few if any who would argue that Cristobal Balenciaga was the epitome of fashion if not the greatest designer who ever lived.

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Bravo to Elisa Goodkind and Lily Mandelbaum for proffering both a “manifesto” of sorts as well as compiling a celebration of the independent spirit when it comes to how we present ourselves to the

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Many a book on the subject of London and its contribution to men’s fashion has been written and expounded upon, but few have found a truly unique way to tackle the topic and stay the course.

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Ines de la Fressange is a fashion phenomenon who started as a runway and print model, morphed into the face and muse of Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld, became a French icon when she “gave” her face to t

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This is an exuberant and effervescent book that stretches beyond just shoes designed by Manolo Blahnik.

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London Uprising is as much a geography/real estate lesson as it is the story of the rise of the British fashion industry in its current state.

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