Contemporary

Reviewed by: 

There have been novels about oil (Giant by Edna Ferber), coal strip-mining (Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom), and traditional coal mining (Baker Towers by Jennifer Haigh).

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Rebecca Schiff’s prose is by turns poignant and wickedly pointed, and terribly funny.”

Reviewed by: 

There’s a reason some bestselling authors are so popular: They deliver stories that pull you right into a realistic world peopled with characters you love, or love to hate, in interesting scenarios

Reviewed by: 

Bohman’s prose is the literary equivalent of an undertow.”

Reviewed by: 

Starting in the 1960s and up to today, Mimi deftly weaves her tale, like the best and most intimate of diaries, skipping the dull moments and focusing on those that mean the most to the overall nar

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Elizabeth Nunez’s latest novel, a retelling of the tragedy King Lear set against a contemporary Caribbean landscape, takes place on the islands of Jamaica, Barbados, and Trinidad, exactly

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Described as a “fictional recreation” The Dig tells the story of the excavation of the famed Sutton Hoo burial site in Suffolk, the findings of which now have pride of place and a permanen

Reviewed by: 

“In the novel the protagonists are filmmakers, women who know how to create illusions through a camera lens and peddle them as reality.

Reviewed by: 

"You are what I cannot be on my own, as I am all that is missing in you."

Reviewed by: 

“Travis Mulhauser hits it out of the park in his first novel. . . . overwhelming triumph . . .”

Reviewed by: 

a highly recommended read.”

Reviewed by: 

“Joshilyn Jackson hits both emotional nerves and the funny bone in this insightful novel.”

Reviewed by: 

The heir is Evie, an American college girl sent on a quest through her dead mother’s letters. It leads her to Oxford University in England and discovery of her surprising birthright.

Reviewed by: 

Julia inherits a gift from her grandmother: the ability to see through a person’s eyes when they are in the most trouble and their soul is reaching out for help, from somewhere in the future.

Reviewed by: 

On July 1, 1967, B. passes her first counterfeit check.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Harry Christmas is no longer an alcoholic. He’s pickled—so long in the drink, particularly Scotch, which he refers to as “the rot,” that there’s no memory of sobriety anymore.

Reviewed by: 

Potential is unrealized in Mingmei Yip’s newest novel. The dialogue is awkwardly delivered and falls flat.

Reviewed by: 

“a warm and slyly funny look at small towns and romance . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“We all in different dreams, everybody in the whole world.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

You don’t have to be a dog lover to love books about dogs—especially when the book is well written and has a good plot.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The heart wants someone to take away the fear. The heart wants answers even if they’re made up.”

Reviewed by: 

Tricky Twenty-Two is the most recent in the Stephanie Plum novels by Janet Evanovich. Her heroine, Stephanie Plum, is a bounty hunter who works for her cousin Vinnie, a bail bondsman.

Reviewed by: 

It’s 1978 and John Lennon has taken off from everyone and everything he knows to find peace in his soul and songs in his psyche.

Reviewed by: 

“Keep an open mind and an open heart. It gets bad sometimes, but things will work out.”

Reviewed by: 

It is November 9th, the day before Fallon is upending her life to relocate from California to New York by herself.

Pages