4–8

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“The world is all around—

filled with colors and shapes and sizes.

When it’s hard to make sense of this world . . .

Look . . .”

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“Every elementary classroom and science lab needs a copy of Green.”

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the incredible story of the power of parental love and overcoming obstacles to find a better life for their children.

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Toni Morrison was the first black editor in publishing, first Black female winner of the Pulitzer and Nobel prizes, author of Beloved, and all-around amazing person.

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“See this little dot?

It’s not

just a blot

on a page.”

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“Mix a pancake,

Stir a pancake,

Pop it in the pan,

Fry the pancake,

Toss the pancake—

Catch it if you can.”

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“Pretty lily.

You Bloom for just one day.

You open in the sun,

and close at the moon,

And your lily life is done.”

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"A magical treasure of a book . . ."

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Cranky, the crane, is cranky. Just look at his sad/mad face. He has had a bad morning, with burnt toast, spilled milk, and spilled Fruitos. Plus, a bird poops on him, and it’s raining.

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the beauty of the book is in Mrs. Macleod’s original illustrations, which combine dipped pen and ink with cut paper and light . . .”

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“In the beginning,

before there were any stars

or any suns

or any sky,

before there was any place

or any thing,

 

there was YOU.”

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Arlo Needs Glasses is a book of only 150 words, but it is filled with color and fun.

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Your Voice, Your Vote will surely inspire young readers to learn about the civic duty to vote. But it’s the history of voting rights . . .

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Neil Gaiman wrote a poem based on a film he made about staying warm, with ideas from folks on social media, their memories of being warm. He calls the poem a long green scarf.

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Scroll entices the reader to really look, linger, enjoy, and repeat.”

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How This Book Got Red is a deceptively gentle tale; it’s actually a powerful story of healing that comes from finding the courage to take on righting a wrong.”

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Raj Haldar, author of the #1 New York Times bestselling picture book P is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever has released his next picture book entitled This Book I

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Irresistibly charismatic Mazie McGear takes us on a bounding tour of her ideas in Mazie’s Amazing Machines. Smart, precocious, preteen Mazie absolutely loves engineering.

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“Mo Willems serves up another fun book that will have young readers howling with delight.”

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Always Sisters is a pertinent tool for both adults and children as they learn to communicate and productively process their feelings together after the loss of a loved one.”

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See the Ghost: Three Stories About Things You Cannot See is a beginning-reader chapter book from David LaRochelle and illustrator Mike Wohnoutka, the creators of the 2021 Geisel-Award-winn

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“a book worth reading with your young child, particularly if they or you are experiencing anxiety. The story is calming and at times beautifully written.”

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"droll humor and just the right amount of spine-tingling creepiness. . . . Even the most reluctant reader will be eager to keep these pages turning."

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"a warm story with a fresh spin on the much-trodden subject."

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Mona Lisa and the Others is one of the best introductory art history books on the market for young readers.

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