4–8

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“the understated text allows the art to shine . . . a lovely way to show how everyone has something to offer.”

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“there is a sense of exuberance in both rhyme and illustration. It’s that energy that makes the book fresh and fun."

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“Young readers will easily identify with Pigeon. . . . a brilliant picture book.”

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A Case of the Zaps is zany robot fun for all the humans among us.”

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“sweetly comforting”

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Every Dog in the Neighborhood is a sweet story about a young boy and his grandmother who live in a city. The boy wants a dog, and his grandmother says, “Nonsense.

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“Kendi’s Goodnight Racism is not your typical sweet fall-asleep lullaby.

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“Wang and Yum have created a delicious story of humanity accessible to all readers, inspiring us all to raise our teacups and share a toast to Chá!”

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Children’s books come in all flavors: sweet, funny, quirky, boring, and gems only an adult would love. Bear and the Whisper of the Wind falls into that last category.

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Stanley’s enthusiasm for Bookmobile Day is quickly slayed when the substitute librarian embarrasses him because the book he wants to read is about a girl.

Do you remember when everything on the ground was a treasure?

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“zany fun”

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Be Thankful for Trees is for young kids in first and second grade. It’s broken into sections, the first section being A tree is food.  “Would life be satisfying without trees?

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The New York Times bestselling creators of Eyes that Kiss in the Corners, Joanna Ho and Dung Ho, are back with a companion book, Eyes that Speak to the Stars, an upliftin

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“by the time I was fourteen, the Taliban threatened to hurt me if I kept speaking out.”

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Illustrations make Out of a Jar sparkle and shine. But is that enough to make it a must-have read?

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“a magnificent example of how stories can light imaginations . . .”

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Marilyn Monroe (Little People, BIG DREAMS) introduces a young child (ages 4–7) to Marilyn Monroe. “Once, in the city of Los Angeles, there was a little girl with lots of love to give.

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this story exemplifies who Abrams is as a person as she continues to use her words to speak up about things that really matter.

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There’s a Ghost in this House is a picture book of a different color.

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The Princess in Black and the Giant Problem benefits from being a story about princesses and superheroes, which apparently little girls can never resist even if the story

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“For parents who want to reassure anxious children, this book will be a useful tool.”

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“Both simple and engaging.”

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Translated from its original Iranian/Persian publication by Sara Khalili, In the Meadow of Fantasies holds a tender yet powerful allure.

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“a gorgeous book, richly illustrated with powerful words, evoking the music of the talented Nina Simone.”

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