Picture Book

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“Sometimes agreeing to be friends and roommates is the family structure that will be the most emotionally successful . . .”

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“The Yellow Suitcase is truly a touching glimpse through a multicultural window into what would otherwise be a very private world.”

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“Floaties, sand bucket, and shovel optional, The Quiet Crocodile Goes to the Beach is all about enjoying an outing with friends.”

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“My Island is the perfect soothing antidote to a busy day.”

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“Parents looking for an uplifting bedtime (or anytime) story, would do well to grab a copy of Little Taco Truck.”

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“a lot of fun, enlivened by Farley’s artwork. Charlotte is a bunny scientist you’ll find yourself cheering for!”

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“Who is this picture book for? Any child would find it a horror story about a destructive father and a mother who can't keep herself or her son safe.

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“Dress Like a Girl is an empowerment book.”

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The Little Green Hen is a twist on a classic story, The Little Red Hen. In Murray’s version, the hen is good at caring for an apple tree.

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The picture book Pencil: A Story with a Point, is a book about a pencil with feelings, and a tablet with a mouth, and junk drawer filled with inanimate things with good ideas and silly pun

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"Mary Walker deserves better than this. And so do young readers."

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“Adams’ and Neal’s homage to Browning’s poem is a book to love.”

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“A masterful combination of words and pictures, Harold Loves His Woolly Hat is about love and the different forms it can take, if only you open your eyes to it and are willing to s

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At what age do children first connect the dots to realize that people have jobs?

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All-of-a-Kind Family Hanukkah is based on Sydney Taylor's original All-of-a-Kind Family books published between 1951 and 1978.

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The intriguing title got this reviewer’s attention. The protagonist is a T. rex named Penelope, and it’s her first day of school. Penelope is nervous about going.

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Pink Is for Boys by Robb Pearlman is a delight.

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In lovely, pastel fauvist palette, Jessica Love, an actor debuting as an author/illustrator, introduces us to Julian, who loves mermaids.

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Bad news breaks and a young girl tries to make sense of it. A gray cloud slips over the family and the community. The parents are sad and distracted. “Suddenly Mom is glued to the television.

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“Five shining stars of fun!”

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Who receives handwritten letters anymore?

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Oh, boy, oh boy, oh boy-o!

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In her oversized new picture book newcomer Ami Shin, a recent and celebrated graduate of the Cambridge School of Illustration based in Korea, is taken with London architecture.

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“Rudy has illustrated her picture book with an elaborate world made of fabrics and scavenged materials, and populated it with handmade felt and fur mice . . .”

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The theme of desperately wanting a pet is not new to children's books, but it takes a different form in I Love Cats!, the follow-up to Stainton and Staake's I Love Dogs!. What is

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