Business, Investing & Economics

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Although there are many other fields in which it matters, sports is probably the most obvious and most widely recognized area of human endeavor in which clutch performance is observed, studied, and

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Anderson, Kumar and Narus have written a pretty good book.

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For years, Hollywood has been selling the story in which a regular guy gets threatened by the minions of an evil government, only to win out against all odds in the end.

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Of Washington, it has often been noted that it doesn’t much matter what you say so long as you say it at the right time.

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The King of Madison Avenue is part biography, part history of advertising, and part advertising as a business.

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"As difficult as our choices are today, they will be more difficult tomorrow."

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Despite our economic malaise, one industry has emerged and continues to thrive: the publication of books about our economic malaise.

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“Yugoslavia should be proud of this small car. Everyone will be
talking about it in the United States.” —Malcolm Bricklin

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 “All I wanted to do in this book was to sell you
on being the artist you already are.”

 

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 Jeffrey Kaye’s timely book, Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration, focuses on the impact of immigration worldwide.  The author uses the term “migrant” to describe

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Andrew Ross Sorkin has written what many consider the definitive book on both Lehman Brothers and the financial crisis.

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Ian Bremmer ought to have an easy time proving his basic premise: “only genuine free markets can generate broad, sustainable, long-term prosperity.” Yet he fails.

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"To err is human,” we are informed by the authors of How They Blew It: The CEOs and Entrepreneurs Behind Some of the World’s Most Catastrophic Business Failures.

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“This shouldn’t be a book,” declares Stan Slap, 13 pages into Bury My Heart in Conference Room B: The Unbeatable Impact of Truly Committed Managers, “it should be a pamphlet.”

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As a follow-up to his wildly successful Duct Tape Marketing, John Jantsch’s newest book, The Referral Engine, manages to build on his previous success with a book that is not only

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Experienced journalist Fran Hawthorne creates an absolutely relatable, if not always easily readable, book.

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