Arts, Design & Photography

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“From whimsical, wacky, pop culture, to the traditional classical artists, to those things-that-make-you-go-huh?

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After plodding through the 170 odd pages of The United States of Fashion: A New Atlas of American Style, this reader is completely confused and finds its timing somewhat pandering

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Persona is the ultimate and quintessential definition of the genre classified as coffee table books.

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The cover of this fashion chronicle is an iconic and historic image of Beverly Johnson wearing a turnout by Scott Barrie and lensed by Francesco Scavullo. Mr.

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“With its helpful tools for beginning artists, imaginative sketches on every page, and its unique approach to drawing this book will also benefit the adult budding artists.”

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“Unfortunately, this isn’t the accurate biography it purports to be.”

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Marnie Fogg has presented a meticulously researched chronicle in The Dress: 100 Ideas that Changed Fashion, but the fashion reader immersed in the world of fashion might take issue with so

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Albert Watson: Creating Photographs is a soft cover book that is hardly a coffee table book.

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“By describing her own journey, Chicago offers an unglamorous view of the life of an artist who became famous as well as infamous . . .”

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If you ask the Catholic Church, they’ll tell you that Saint Veronica—the apocryphal woman who wiped Christ’s bloodied, sweat-soaked face as he made his way to his death at Calvary—is the patron sai

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This gorgeously produced book is a baby photo album with one major difference. All the Dads are gay men, married or single, who have become parents through surrogacy or by adoption.

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Call it a celebration, a fortieth anniversary gift, a visual chronicle of one of the most controversial fashion designers of the 20th and 21st centuries . . . Vivienne Westwood.

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Homer was an expressive artistic powerhouse, and the Cullercoats work proves his versatility.”

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“A nicely crafted popular history, Battle for the Big Top will appeal to anyone who has ever wondered about the men who gave us the thrill of three-ring circuses.”  

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“Isn’t the final goal of surrealism, after all, to transform the world?”
—Luis Buñuel

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Marimekko: The Art of Printmaking is a celebration for one of the most renowned and recognizable “créateurs” of the last and present centuries.

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“Gross and Daley’s photographs tell a story, a deeply important story . . .”

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Do Something for Nothing is no real reflection of the magnanimity of the project behind it.

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It was probably a very good idea not to include the words “aura reading” in the title of this book, even though that is 100 percent what it is about.

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“a deep intellectual probe into the importance and significance of photography as it morphed from a secondary tool of artists into photography’s acceptance as the art itsel

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Australian journalist Chloe Angyal’s Turning Pointe delves into the many troubling issues that have been pervasive in classical ballet companies in the US.

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United Arrows serves as a chronicle, a diary of sorts, about a revolution and the trajectory of a retailer and brand that have been in business for 30 years in Tokyo.

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“In these pages, ideas and creativity still matter, making this welcome book a cause for celebration.”

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“Mona Kuhn: Works will secure her prominence as an artist who has a love for life and and the ability to manifest that love through beautiful photography.

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”Many will judge that, despite all the emotional chaos, William Feaver has cornered a lion, and that Lucian Freud has earned his place in the pantheon of great post-war realist painters.

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