Psychology

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Anthologies by authors that reproduce previous writings do not always make the best reading and can appear unconnected, dated, and stale.

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The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought is a gripping memoir that blends personal experience with history and complex empirical research.

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Sports writers, at least the really good ones, have always seemed to be philosophers driven to make a living or pay back their college education loans.

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If you are going to read one book on parenting this year, make it The Collapse of Parenting by Leonard Sax.

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Tales from the Couch is an interesting book and will likely appeal to non-professional readers.

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“Whether you are a believer, an agnostic, or an atheist, this book is about you.”

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Sheila Hamilton and her daughter Sophie suffered unimaginably and yet found their way to wholeness again. Both were entirely upended by the behavior and suicide of their husband and father, David.

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an illuminating linguistic, cartographic, and historical exploration of Parisian lusts.”

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“We neglect our bodies because we underestimate their intelligence . . .”

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Jane McGonigal has been acclaimed for decades for her theories in gaming and the value of games in relation to positive psychology and problem solving; however, it wasn’t until 2009, when she suffe

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“Sometimes it feels like Big Brother is watching—even when he’s not.”

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The New Politics of Experience and the Bitter Herbs by Theodor Itten and Ron Roberts is a bold challenge and daring call.

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“The case Dr. Zayas makes for immigration reform is compelling . . .”

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“a collection of tightly written and deeply moving testaments to the brevity of life and the existential imperative to live it well.”

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“What you say and what the other hears won’t coincide. There are gaps between . . . what we say and what we mean.”

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“We don’t like mental illness. We have no time or desire to engage with it in others except as something to gawp at and to define ourselves against.”

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"The lack of direct immersion and the increasing rarity of actual face-to-face interactions are the true cause of our anomie . . .

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“Kudos to Dr. Biglan for daring to write this book, and let’s hope for all of our sakes that policy makers adopt some of the principles.”

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“Anything we practice repeatedly changes the brain; fixate on iPhones and similar screens, and we become better at staying helplessly glued to them.”

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The Price of Silence is a concise, heartfelt addition to books about mental illness.”

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There are very few books that cover the field of psychiatry in all its complexities and do so in a clear and easily read format.

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“The text encourages the reader in critical thinking about the topics raised—whether they be thematic, case studies, theoretical, or simply thought experiments—a seemingly unwieldy amount o

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Hard to Love is a courageous endeavor that simplifies a very complex, enigmatic disorder and clarifies both symptoms and solutions.

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This book is like a key to opening doors across educational and medical landscapes. . . .

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“. . . young people today have the greatest communication and creativity tools ever devised, but the stuff they’re creating stinks.”

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