History

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The Navy SEALS are the elite of the elite in the military of the United States. They train for missions according to their acronym: SEa, Air and Land.

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“This is an important addition to the library of Holocaust literature, but it should be read with other historical post-war texts that examine the perpetrators of the Holocaust more deeply.

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“Absolutely gripping . . . armchair travel and exploration doesn't get any better than this.”

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Al Worden, command module pilot on the Apollo 15 lunar mission, belongs to a unique club, one of only six men who flew to the dark side of the moon, alone and out of contact with any other human be

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“Gellman’s steadfast refusal to psychoanalyze the most complex and confounding president of the 20th century—a tendency most writers are helpless to resist—is both surprising and surprising

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If you have ever wondered why many veterans of war find it difficult, if not impossible, to talk about their experiences, this book will help you understand.

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“Renehan explains how one of America’s first true detective stories drew ‘national journalistic attention’ but also went remembered by famed writer Nathaniel Hawthorne.”

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“Why do humans make images?” John-Paul Stonard might as well be asking why do humans breathe, eat, walk, or talk. Because we need to? Because we can? Because we do?

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“concise, clear, easy-to-follow guide through Islam as both a religion and a political-cultural force. . . . impressively thorough.”

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“Stephen English, with his unadorned, straight-up prose in The Army of Alexander the Great, proves that the amazing can be found in the details.”

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“a rich and varied portrait of Israel . . .”

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“Daly’s research and vibrant writing provide the reader with a clear understanding, especially through the two men he selected to honor, of what police work is supposed to be.”

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“James Oakes in The Crooked Path to Abolition tells how far Lincoln could go on emancipation within the Constitution—but how far was he willing to go?”

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“an incomplete, unconvincing picture.”

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“a well-illustrated book with overview maps to bring to life what could be termed the beginning of the Western way of warfare.”

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“Poller’s Aldous Huxley offers readers a clear, thorough guide to Huxley’s metaphysical thought and the process through which it evolved over the course of his career as a writer.”

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“In his sobering yet compelling book, Tharoor shows how in today’s India, where Hindu nationalists are firmly in power, a majoritarian mindset has supplanted the democratic mindset.”

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“This book is really not about homicide but about crime, justice, and the science used to find the truth.

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“Gaudi tells the story of the war and its principal antagonists with verve, erudition, and page-turning detail.”

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“This is a great book to have on the shelf when reading any naval history of the war to research the Navy ships involved.”

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“. . . essential for anyone wanting to know who Magritte was, as a person, a painter, and a thinker.”

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“This sweeping and novel synthesis exploring the arc of the human condition— its highly diverse forms of political organizing, and the future that lays in store for us—may well prove to be

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“Applegate’s well written and exhaustively researched biography of Polly Adler offers unique insight into a remarkable immigrant as well as the Roaring ’20s.”

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“provides a more nuanced picture of an almost tragic figure trying to bridge the old and new political order between representative democracy and the oligarchy of the English nobility.”

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