African American

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In February of 1969, Duke University was on the cusp of national prominence, about to eclipse Emory and Vanderbilt as the South’s premier institution of higher learning and preparing what would be

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Let’s not call this a review, deal? Who reviews June Jordan? She was the queen of everything.

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Buses Are a Comin’ offers more than a tribute to the Freedom Riders and other activists who put their lives on the line in the face of segregationist massive resistance and stirre

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The Ledger and the Chain emerges as an essential and definitive work to stand alongside Walter Johnson’s Soul by Soul, Edward E.

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Natalie Baszile first caught a whiff of fame with her novel, Queen Sugar, that was adapted for TV and co-produced by Ava DuVernay and Oprah Winfrey.

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“The poems in Waterbaby are present. They tell the truth and will inspire readers to lust for more.”

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“Our Team gloriously chronicles the excruciating birth pains and exhilarating triumph of a ballclub that played an undervalued but coequal role in challenging major league baseball's instit

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“For its penetrating thought, its joyful language, and its eclectic wanderings among the peaks and valleys of high and low culture, this book is an act of sublime generosity from a brillian

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“Filled with vivid first-person accounts, Traveling Black is a superb history that captures a shameful aspect of the American story.”

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This book might have been subtitled An Anthology of Black Lesbian Writing.

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“In Gates’ capable hands The Black Church is a stirring story, told with compassion, respect, and not a little awe.”

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From the start it is clear Floating in a Most Peculiar Way is going to be a journey of discovery like few others. Not many people can say they are from a country that no longer exists.

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A venture titled Bookmarked has been launched by Ig Publishing. The theory and practice of the series is that a writer considers some other writer’s book that influenced her or him greatly.

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American history is “littered with utopian experiments that began with giddy promise and ended in depressing failure,” writes Thomas Healy. In Soul City, he tells one such story.

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According to Wikipedia, the Reverend Al Sharpton preached his first sermon at the age of four.

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“The slave trade persisted in New York in the decades before the Civil War because

the city was the capital of the Southern slave economy.”

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Balancing and mixing, with rhyme and reason, love and anger, good and bad, memory and the created present, all to tell the story of a life, a memoir unrestrained, devoid o

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“chronicles the century-long struggle following the Civil War by Black Americans and other people of color for true civil and social rights, particularly the right to engage in interracial—

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Every sentence in this book deserves to be treasured and relished.

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“On Imagination” is the opening poem in Library of American’s African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle and Song. It was written by Phillis Wheatley in the mid-17th century.

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“This book is the work of a master historian at the top of his craft.”

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Raggin’ On: The Art of Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson’s House and Journals may look like a book, but it is really an entire life devoted to art with which an effort to compact, to condense an

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Vanguard serves both as a tocsin and an inspiring map forward if we are to protect voting rights for all.”

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“A recognition slowly arises that we are all in this together and the time for an awakening to that fact is now.”

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