African American

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Balancing and mixing, with rhyme and reason, love and anger, good and bad, memory and the created present, all to tell the story of a life, a memoir unrestrained, devoid o

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“chronicles the century-long struggle following the Civil War by Black Americans and other people of color for true civil and social rights, particularly the right to engage in interracial—

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Every sentence in this book deserves to be treasured and relished.

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“This book is the work of a master historian at the top of his craft.”

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“On Imagination” is the opening poem in Library of American’s African American Poetry: 250 Years of Struggle and Song. It was written by Phillis Wheatley in the mid-17th century.

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Raggin’ On: The Art of Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson’s House and Journals may look like a book, but it is really an entire life devoted to art with which an effort to compact, to condense an

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Vanguard serves both as a tocsin and an inspiring map forward if we are to protect voting rights for all.”

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“A recognition slowly arises that we are all in this together and the time for an awakening to that fact is now.”

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“O’Neill’s first book is a dazzling reminder that American racism is robust and virulent.”

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The Dead Are Arising draws on decades of extensive and remarkably revealing interviews with a variety of noteworthy figures in Malcolm X’s life—both friends and enemies—to constru

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“Humility, dignity, and character—those were Mays’ personal trademarks. He was an exemplary baseball player and is an exemplary citizen.” 

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"Davis and Douglas arose from very different Americas to create one tragic national history."

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The Sword and the Shield delivers both strong storytelling and exemplary history, dismantling popular distortions of its subjects, and arriving at a nuanced and profoundly reveali

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“Pippin’s artwork captivates and inspires.”

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Thabile Makue’s sophomore collection, ‘mamaseko, explores intergenerational trauma through repetitive forms and turbulent language.

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The Last Negroes at Harvard is an accomplished work of collective autobiography that tells a compelling story of incipient transformation in a transformative time—but in a place s

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“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice should not be read so much as a diatribe against racial inequity, although those evils are clearly outlined, but rather as a lif

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Tough Love should be recommend reading for students and interns working for NGOs, and nonprofit organizations whose work and research covers policy concerns.”

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“David Zucchino cuts through a century of propaganda, myth, and big white lies to unmask the stunning history of the Wilmington coup, its origins in the political climate of the era, and it

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A Fool’s Errand by Lonnie Bunch III is a literary combo. It’s a book about a man, a building, and a race. This is a book that needed to be written.

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This short book shows Toni Morrison’s “black girl magic,” as Zadie Smith writes in the Prologue. It shows her beauty.

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Saeed Jones is an award-winning poet, editor, and co-host of BuzzFeed’s AM to PM morning show. His latest book How We Fight for Our Lives is his powerful coming of age memoir.

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“Nicholas Buccola’s captivating new book, The Fire Is Upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr.

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